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Featured News, News

Softball Secures #3 Seed in NCAA Division II Championship; Faces #6 Merrimack on Thursday at Molloy College

INDIANAPOLIS, Ind. – The Caldwell University softball team earned the #3 seed in the NCAA Division II Championship and will be part of the East Region 2 hosted by Molloy College. The Central Atlantic Collegiate Conference Champions secured the conference’s automatic bid and will take on #6 Merrimack College in the opening round on Thursday, May 11 at 2:30 pm. The Cougars enter the tournament at 44-13 overall and will be making their tenth consecutive appearance in the NCAA Tournament.

Caldwell takes on the #6 seed Merrimack College in their opening game on Thursday at 2:30 pm. Host and #2 seed Molloy faces #7 seed NYIT at noon. The winners will advance in the winner’s bracket to Friday’s game at 11 am. The teams that lose on Thursday will play an elimination game on Friday at 1:30 pm. The full schedule with times is listed below.

The Cougars enter the NCAA Division II Championship with a 44-13 mark. Caldwell won the CACC Regular Season title with a 25-1 record and won their seventh CACC Tournament Championship this past weekend. CACC Player of the Year junior Marisa Monasseri (Monroe, N.J.) leads the Cougars with a .507 batting average with 11 homeruns, 11 doubles, 65 RBI and .808 slugging percentage. First Team All-CACC senior Lauren Frye (Jupiter, Fla.) is second on the team with average at .428 with a team-best 77 hits along with 12 doubles this season.

In the other half of the region, East Region 1 will be hosted by Adelphi University and features the top seed Adelphi along with #4 University of New Haven, #5 Mercy College and #8 Wilmington University.

Here’s the complete schedule for this week’s tournament.

2017 NCAA Division II East Region Softball Tournament

East 2 Regional Schedule (Double Elimination)
Host: Molloy College, Rockville Centre, NY
Thursday, May 11
Game 1: #2 Molloy vs. #7 NYIT – 12:00 pm
Game 2: #3 Caldwell vs. #6 Merrimack – 2:30 pm
Friday, May 12
Game 3: Winner of Game 1 vs. Winner of Game 2 – 11:00 am
Game 4: Loser of Game 1 vs. Loser of Game 2 – 1:30 pm
Game 5: Winner Game 4 vs. Loser of Game 3 – 4:00 pm
Saturday, May 13
Game 6: Winner Game 3 vs. Winner Game 5 – 12:00 pm
Game 7: If Necessary – 2:30 pm

East 1 Regional Schedule (Double Elimination)
Host: Adelphi University, Garden City, NY
Thursday, May 11
Game 1: #1 Adelphi vs. #8 Wilmington Molloy – 12:00 pm
Game 2: #4 New Haven vs. #5 Mercy – 2:30 pm
Friday, May 12
Game 3: Winner Game 1 vs Winner Game 2 – 11:00 am
Game 4: Loser Game 1 vs. Loser Game 2 – 1:30 pm
Game 5: Winner Game 4 vs. Loser Game 3 – 4:00 pm
Saturday, May 13
Game 6: Winner Game 3 vs. Winner Game 5 – 12:00 pm
Game 7: If Necessary – 2:30 pm

Alumni News, Featured News, News

Alumna Tanya Freeman Honored as Family Lawyer of the Year

Caldwell, N.J., May 10, 2017– Caldwell University alumna Tanya Freeman, a partner at Weiner Law Group in Parsippany, New Jersey, was honored as Family Lawyer of the Year by the Hudson County Bar Association on April 18 at Liberty House.

Freeman, who has represented professional athletes, television personalities and other high-profile celebrities, fondly remembers her days studying political science at Caldwell. She returned to school as a mother with six children and as a full-time employee at Blue Cross Blue Shield of New Jersey. “I really invented myself in my late 30s, and it started at Caldwell. It was so good for my kids to see that Mommy went back.” She still proudly hangs in her office the plaque she received for earning the highest grade point average in the Political Science Department.

Before entering the legal world, Freeman led audit teams for over a decade. She was licensed to practice law in New York and New Jersey in 2012 after graduating cum laude from Touro Law Center. In 2014, Gov. Chris Christie appointed Freeman to the board of directors of University Hospital in Newark, where she chairs the Governance, Ethics and Legal committee. The Thomson Reuters list of New Jersey Super Lawyers named her a “rising star” for two consecutive years. She was also elected to the board of trustees of the Hudson County Bar Association in 2016.

Freeman recalls how she was inspired to start studying at Caldwell. While working for Blue Cross Blue Shield, she was staffing a career fair booth in Caldwell’s cafeteria and decided to look into enrolling. She was 60 credits shy of her undergraduate degree. Soon she was attending classes and was on her way to gaining her bachelor’s degree. “I’m still friends with my Caldwell classmates,” she says.

As a divorce lawyer, she tells her clients her story so they know that that no matter what their age or state in life there is great hope and that they too can take the steps to reinvent themselves.

 

Library, News

Finals Week @ the Library!

The Jennings Library has a lot of activities planned to help you survive the stress of finals. We’ll be open extended hours starting Wednesday May 10. Beginning Sunday May 14, hot drinks will be available after 7 p.m. Free massages will be in the Library Monday 5/15 and Tuesday Tuesday 5/16- 11 am-2 pm.

Come join us!

If you can’t make it in, don’t forget that the Library’s databases and ebooks are available 24/7 (on and off-campus) through the links on the Library’s homepage. Reference Librarians are just a click away if you need research or citation help — simply click on the “Ask Us” button on the Library homepage and we’ll answer your questions by chat or e-mail as soon as we can.

A special thank you to the Office of Student Engagement for providing the free massages and hot beverages.

Extended Hours Finals Week::

WednesdayThursday (5/10-5/11)- 7:30 a.m. to 2 a.m.
Friday (5/12) 7:30 a.m. to 7 p.m.
Saturday (5/13) – 9 a.m. to 7 p.m.
Sunday (5/14) – 1 p.m. to Midnight
Monday (5/15) to Wednesday (5/17) – 7:30 a.m. to 2 a.m.

Don’t forget to take our survey for cookies during finals: http://libguides.caldwell.edu/semestersurvey

Business News, News

Caldwell University’s Research and Creative Arts Day

On Wednesday, April 26, 2017, the Caldwell University highlighted undergraduate and graduate student research and promoting STEAM, which stands for science, technology, engineering, arts and math. The Business Division was proud to have five undergraduate students, either majoring or minoring in Business, represented at this event.

Gabriella Armaral, Comparative Statistical Analysis of the Endangerment of the Bald Eagle


The science of statistics extends its reach into varying areas of our lives, such as; agriculture, business, economics, medicine, pharmaceutics, environment, wildlife, and the government. Statistics is the science of planning, obtaining, summarizing, and interpreting data, then subsequently drawing well founded conclusions on said data.” Relatively few people study both the general mathematical approach to statistics as well as the business approach to statistics. The two methods of studying statistics can be analyzed by comparing and contrasting them and then applying them to a real world situation. This project will attempt to further conclusions about the base of knowledge in statistical applications to see whether one approach, the other, or a combination of the two is most efficient.

A real world situation that direly depends on statistics is the study of endangered species. This paper will focus on the endangerment of the bald eagle. Whenever statistical research is conducted for scientific application, typically the mathematical approach is used. This process can be longer, more tedious and involved, as well as more complex than the business approach. This paper will attempt to validate the overlying hypothesis that a combination of the two approaches is the most efficient and effective way to obtain the best possible statistical data. Using the principles and accuracy of the mathematical approach, in addition to the convenience, organization, straightforward and comprehensible visualizations of the business approach, will lead to the clearest possible results and conclusions. This is the ideal way to handle real world situations and in the case of the bald eagle, would most likely uncover underlying issues that are causing the fluctuation of their appearance on and off the endangered species list.

SIEUWERD Blankenstein, Financial Regression Analysis of the Performance of English Premier League Teams and Their Financial Expenditures

This paper examines the financial expenditures of European football, specifically, the English Premier League (EPL) teams during the 2014-2015 season, and their relationship with team performance measured in points during the same season. Points are accumulated as follows: 3 for a win, 1 for a tie, and 0 for a loss. European football is the most popular spectator sport played worldwide, and it is currently one of the fastest growing sports in the United States. European football should not be mistaken with the American equivalent, known as American football. Football in Europe is what soccer is in the United States, a sport played by two teams of eleven players, where each team attempts to put the ball in the opponent’s goal by using any body part except arms and hands. European football has become a commercial giant, with the most competitive league being the English Premier League. The EPL consists of twenty teams every season, although the teams can and do change, depending on their performance. Each year three teams are promoted and three teams are relegated based on performance. According to a Deloitte analysis, the projected annual revenue for the 2016-2017 season for the combined twenty Premier League teams is £4.32 Billion (Deloitte’s Annual Review of Football Finance 2016). This revenue number indicates the enormous impact of finances on the EPL. Additionally, the EPL is known for the clubs’ extreme spending on wages. For example, during the 2014-2015 season, the average wages/revenue ratio was 61 percent, but certain teams were far above the average with ratios of up to 85 percent (Deloitte’s Annual Review of Football Finance 2016).

Aidan Groll, Cost Benefit Analysis of Legalizing Marijuana in New Jersey

Marijuana is the most commonly-used illegal substance in the United States. The debate over whether marijuana should be legalized has long troubled many American citizens and our politicians. To better understand the roots of the debate, it is imperative to analyze the history and use of the drug, as well as the implications of its prospective legalization. This paper explores such topics and more specifically determines if the State of New Jersey should adopt legislation that legalizes the drug. Fortunately, the research on this topic is informed by the actions of citizens and politicians in the states of Washington and Colorado, which have passed legislation legalizing marijuana and have produced research on the impact it has had in their respective states. Utilizing this research and supplementary studies, a cost-benefit analysis will be constructed on the impact the legalization of marijuana could have on the state of New Jersey. The focus of the analysis will be economic, legal, and social. Based upon the findings, a recommendation will be made on what course of action New Jersey should take.

Kathryn Reilly, Cryptography: Is This Ancient Practice Keeping Society Safe?

Society has come to rely on a series of technological formats to fit everyday needs. Each day people check pockets or purses for cell phones, car keys, and wallets that are filled with credit and debit cards, all coded to work and keep information from being hacked. Cell phones have finger print readers so that only the owner can access them. Debit cards now have security chips, making them harder to steal private information from. Businesses often operate using the internet which causes a need to encrypt confidential professional data to protect privacy.

The coding of technology stems from an ancient practice of cryptography, the art of writing and solving codes. Cryptography has existed for thousands of years. It can be traced to Ancient Egypt, the Roman Empire, and Elizabethan England. It was used during the American Revolution with the hanging lanterns to convey if the British were coming by land or by sea. The practice of encoding and decoding messages had a drastic defining moment during World War Two with the Enigma Code. That moment marked the integration of coding to protect secrets into modern technology.

Society is now facing an unexpected problem with the technology it created; 64% of Americans have experienced a major data breach. Almost every major company has an intranet and a share drive where all employee records and documents are kept from public eyes. Recently the act of cryptography has come under public scrutiny because of the United States Privacy Act. Consumers are conflicted in their view of government regulation: they simultaneously expect privacy while seeking government protection from data misuse. Yet, at the same time citizens expect the government’s assurance of safety by allowing the government to intrude on the privacy of others. The government needs to crack codes to gain access to information while protecting its own information from being hacked by others.

Randall Stafford, The Portrayal of Female Athletes in the Media

Female athletes have become great influencers to a new generation of young women in the United States. Thanks to the Title IX generation of athletes, young girls had an array of role models from whom they could learn that participating in sports was socially acceptable. Female athletes were able to enjoy the same benefits derived from sports that men have experienced throughout history. Benefits such as discipline, confidence, leadership skills, and independence.

Despite this progress in societal values, a stigma surrounding female athletes and their image still persists in the media and amongst athletic programs across the country. The representation of female athletes in mass media, or lack thereof, perpetuates the negative cultural view of women in sports. Minimal exposure of female athletes to viewers allows society to continue to believe that sports are made for men only. The sexualization of female athletes in the media allows society to maintain the traditional view of a female –that they are feminine and weak. Based on numerous studies on sport media companies’, such as Sports Illustrated and ESPN, the data has revealed that most coverage of female athletes represents their femininity and contains sexist language. Mass media’s impact on society’s culture plays a major role in creating the image of female athletes. Now, the media must take the lead in these changing times and cover women for their talents, achievements, and success, in other words, the same way they cover men. Only then can we see some real change and equality for women. Over the past 50 years society has made dramatic changes for women, more opportunities in the workforce, in education, and in politics. Now the time has come for the sports industry and the sports media to catch up and give female athletes the respect they deserve.

Featured News, News

Caldwell 3v3 Basketbrawl

On April 7, the Facility Operations and Event Management class at Caldwell University hosted the Caldwell 3v3 Basketbrawl, a fundraising event to benefit the  Center for Autism and Applied Behavior Analysis on the university’s campus.

The university’s students, as well as staff, came out and enjoyed an afternoon of friendly competition with their peers. Competing to raise awareness and donations for the Center, students broke into teams of ten for a round robin schedule. Sponsored by Jimmy John’s, Forte and Calandra’s, the attendees were served a plethora of dining options while watching the game.

With April being Autism Awareness month, our goals were to help educate our community about autism and interact with our neighbors on campus. After hosting this event, we hope that we will work with the ABA Center in the near future.

The Business Division at Caldwell University was happy to host the Caldwell 3v3 Basketbrawl fundraiser with the help of the Sports Management Club and the Office of Student Life. This event allowed Caldwell’s students to apply the concepts that we have learned and pull off an event that met the mission of the university and the course. The Sports Management Club and the Facility Operations and Event Management class would like to extend a thank you to the entire campus, our sponsors, and the Caldwell community.

Featured News, News

Undergraduate and graduate projects highlighted at Research and Creative Arts Day

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Caldwell, N.J., May 1, 2017 – Caldwell University hosted Research and Creative Arts Day, featuring innovative projects by students, faculty and staff.

The day was aimed at highlighting Caldwell undergraduate and graduate student research and promoting STEAM, which stands for science, technology, engineering, arts and math. “We had a great turnout and great intensity. It was a chance for our students to get feedback, hone their communications skills and learn how to field questions from different audiences,” said Associate Professor of Biology Dr. Agnes Berki, who chaired the taskforce that organized the event.

Biology student Veronica Guirguis showcased her project, “The Future of Cancer Care: Virtual Reality,” which demonstrated how virtual reality could help to educate patients about treatments, could be used as a therapy to lessen pain and suffering, and could give them a chance to visit the “most amazing parts of the world.” She appreciated being able to “raise awareness and the potential of using” virtual therapy.

Stephanie Silva, a senior nursing major, presented the project “Who you gonna call? Rapid response teams,” which compared staff-initiated versus family-initiated response during a decline in health. She was delighted that nurses from her clinical site, Morristown Medical Center, came to view the research. She appreciated the feedback from those who saw her poster. “They had really good questions and made me think differently about my research. It was a great experience.”

Naissa Piverger, Melaine Betancur and Nicholette Worgs, public health educator majors, presented their research, “Utilizing Telemedicine to impact the older adult population.” Thanks to a Verizon technology grant, they taught seniors at their internship site, Marian Manor, how to use mobile devices to monitor and track their health status.

Manoucheka Jean, a nursing student,  who displayed her project, “The importance of a comprehensive patient education program in patients diagnosed with heart failure”  said the conference was a good opportunity to practice public speaking.

Chelsie Deusa, a communications and media studies and political science major, presented her scholars project work, “Northern Ireland: Divided by Religion.” She felt “proud and accomplished” to showcase it since she had put so much time into the work.

The keynote presentation was given by Dr. Jill Bargonett, a leading molecular biologist, breast cancer researcher and professor of biological sciences at Hunter College. In a lively, interactive format, she spoke on “Choreographing Genomics and Cancer Biology into Understanding.” A former dancer, she showed biological processes through dance.

Bargonetti is widely published; she and her team have made significant advances in research that looks at protein diversity in cells with the kind of genetic mutations linked to “triple negative” breast cancer.

Cosmo Cirillo, a doctoral student in the educational leadership program, was a member of a team that studied “Korean students’ views on caring teachers”. He said it was a great experience to have visitors come up to the booth “and test you on your knowledge” of an interesting project.  Vanessa Cirillo, another doctoral student on the team, said, “You don’t know how much you know about your research until you have to answer questions.”

Statewide honors

Some of the projects displayed had received statewide recognition this year. Science students Deborah Balthazar and Amanda Surujnauth received the first-place Outstanding Poster Presentation award for their project “What Is on Your Toothbrush? Are You Brushing with Fecal Matter?” at the Independent College Fund of New Jersey’s Undergraduate Research Symposium in March.

Pre-med post-baccalaureate student and alumna Jessica Binkiewicz was among the 2017 class of the Governor’s STEM Scholars honored by the New Jersey Legislature in Trenton on March 23. Her research project was titled “Thieves’ and Pulling Essential Oils Are Effective Antibacterial Agents against the Bacterium Escherichia coli.” During the school yearBinkiewicz led a research team of three high school students on the project—one from Wayne Hills High School and two from Paterson Charter High School for Science and Technology.

Research and Creative Arts Day was organized by the Research Task Force created by Dr. Barbara Chesler, vice president for Academic Affairs.  The Research Task Force is comprised of faculty members Dr. Karla Batres, Dr. Ellina Chernobilsky, Dr. Thomson Ling, Dr. Jennifer Noonan, Dr. Kenneth Reeve, Dr. Meghan Ryan, Dr. Rosa Sanchez, Dr. Theodora Sirota, Dr. Marnie Sperling, Dr. Sara Tedrick Parikh, Dr. Rebecca Vega, Dr. Jason Vladescu and Berki. Also on the task force is Retention Specialist Maureen McNish and student Bipkin Koirala, a senior math and art major. Student volunteers who ushered at the event included: Amelia Biswas, Anika Sanjana, Prithy Adhikary, Shreyoshi Hossain, Michelle Eng, Ngima Sherpa, Anamika Sharma, Usha Katuwal, and Romina Ghale. The judges were greeted and registered by staff volunteers Christine Szeluga, Diana Lee, Alison Self, and Elaine Maliszewski.

Business News, News

Delta Mu Delta Induction 2017

The Division of Business is proud to present the twenty-two students who were inducted into the international business administration honor society, Delta Mu Delta. Caldwell University instituted its Lambda Psi Chapter of Delta Mu Delta in 2009. In order to qualify for this prestigious society, students must have completed at least half of their coursework and maintain a GPA in the top 20% of their class.

2017 Inductees

Jawaher Fahad Almahbub
Taryn Kanani Auyong
Brandi-Lee Brochu
Rayshel Campaña
Melissa Marie Cook
Ean Francis Drew
Steven Eigenlaub Jr.
Kelly Marilly Gonzalez
Aidan R. Groll
Theresa Gail Henry
David Charles Jones
William R. Levier
Marina Cara Maret
Fritz Meister
Ryan L. Moran
John C. Motley
Minhtruc N. Nguyen
Coral Ismeyri Peguero
Rebecca Eileen Ryan
Shania Andrea Williams
Simone Maria Zaccardi
Maximilian Ziegler

Each year, Caldwell University selects honorary members, who exhibit excellence in business and maintain strong ties to Caldwell University’s Business programs, to be inducted into the honor society. The Division of Business was proud to induct two distinguised alumni, Anne Poltorak and Robert Melchionne.

In her 28 years at Tilcon, Anne Poltorak faced many challenges and has risen to the occasion each time. Anne began her career as a Personnel Assistant for Millington Affiliated, working her way up to Human Resources Administrator to her current position as Human Resource Manager, a position she has held proudly since 1999. Her role as HR Manager encompasses but is not limited to balancing the need of the employees managing, training, recruiting, mediation, union labor negotiations, policy developments, benefits, internships, and performance management. Additionally, Anne takes an active role outside of Tilcon, volunteering her time and talent at her local church, mentors an Eagle Scout, and being an active volunteer for Mane Stream’s “Adaptive Horsemanship Program” for riders with disabilities; there she can channel her equestrian talents into helping others to appreciate horses and riding. She is also a certified fitness instructor.

Robert Melchionne is a Vice President and commercial relationship manager for the Middle Market Lending Group of Provident Bank specializing in commercial & industrial loans to businesses in the manufacturing, fabrication, wholesale, transportation, and other professional industries. In a banking career of nearly 20 years, Robert has experience in providing commercial credit facilities to borrowers with needs such as short-term and long-term working capital, term debt financing for fixed asset expansion, business acquisition, commercial mortgages for real property, and international trade finance services for import and export companies. In addition to managing a portfolio of bank clients, Robert is responsible for actively seeking privately held, middle market companies, or those with annual revenues of $15MM to $200MM in central and northern New Jersey. His efforts help to grow Provident Bank’s existing portfolio with new commercial relationships. Prior to joining The Provident Bank, he was a commercial relationship manager for M&T Bank Sovereign Bank, and Spencer Savings Bank.

The purposes of Delta Mu Delta are to promote higher scholarship in training for business and to recognize and reward scholastic attainment in business subjects. Delta Mu Delta membership provides recognition for a lifetime. It is the highest national recognition a business student can earn.

Featured News, News

Political Science Students Selected for National Model United Nations Program

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Caldwell, N.J., April 19, 2017 – Four Caldwell University political science students attended a program at the United Nations that brings students from colleges and universities all over the world together to discuss global issues.

Padriptee Lama, Patrick Rotondo, Daniele Roca and Katherine Llangari were selected for the National Model United Nations program in New York City. The program simulates a regular U.N. session. They were selected to represent the nation of Azerbaijan and attended two General Assembly sessions.

The students were expected to come to the program prepared to solve three pressing issues relevant to the 21 simulated U.N. committees. The National Collegiate Conference Association sponsors the National Model United Nations.

Lama is a senior pursuing a bachelor’s degree in political science and international relations; Rotondo is a senior with history and political science majors and a minor in pre-law. Roca is a junior with a major in political science and minors in pre-law and business. Llangari is a junior majoring in political science with pre-law and Italian minors.

For students like Llangari who are considering careers in diplomacy, the program was a worthwhile practical experience. “NMUN taught me that no matter where you are raised, when you have to represent other people’s interests you have to sometimes put your beliefs aside and see what is best for them.” She found it gratifying that other students agreed that international cooperation is needed to affect global change. “This is good to hear because we, the future generation, know that in order to address 21st-century issues we have to collaborate with each other.”

It was also a rewarding experience to meet students from all over the world and to network with U.N. staff and volunteers. “Debating and acting very diplomatic was also an incredible feeling for those of us who are interested in pursuing a career in diplomacy,” said Llangari.

The students are members of the Political Science Club.  They were selected because they are active members of the club and engaged in their political science classes at Caldwell. Dr. Domenic Maffei, chairman of the History and Political Science Department, and the students’ advisor, said Model UN is a great program that ties in with the department’s goal of vigorously promoting the application of theory to practice. “This program exposes our students to the institutional processes of the world’s leading diplomatic organization. The skills they learn during these sessions will benefit them greatly once they graduate.”