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“Human Not So Kind” Art Exhibition Focuses on Natural World, Beauty and Destruction

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Caldwell, N.J., May 20, 2019 – The Mueller Gallery at Caldwell University is featuring an exhibition focusing on the natural world and its beauty and raising awareness of how humanity is disrupting that beauty. “Human Not So Kind” was created by student Phoebe Schepacarter for her senior art project.

Schepacarter, who received her Bachelor Fine Arts degree on May 19, said the exhibition gave her a way to highlight issues that many people are not talking about related to nature and the environment.

The front room of the gallery features 14 different pieces representing the natural world. “These works feature seven different biome areas that focus on the natural beauty of each area. Contrasting the beauty of each of these landscapes, are multiple ways that humanity has negatively affected the natural world,” said Schepacarter of Franklinville, New Jersey. Each landscape piece has an informational panel that has five facts about the biome and a statement about the ways humanity is destroying the world.

The back room of the gallery focuses on the positives of what humanity is doing for the earth. “There is a nine foot tall mural that is a map of the world indicating how well each country is taking care of the world and there are 24 panels highlighting specific places where people are taking care of the world. The panels also provide recommendations on how people can alter their lifestyles to be more earth friendly,” explained Schepacarter.

“I hope to make people feel responsible and to create a wave of change, even if it is just small daily changes to improve the world we live in, as it is the only one we have and we are all responsible for the condition it is in,” said Schepacarter.

Schepacarter’s artist statement is:

It is human nature to believe we are not at fault. To believe that we are doing the right thing because it directly benefits us. Contrary to this belief not everything we do is right or just, but everything we do has a cause and effect. The world around us is constantly changing and we are all the cause. These pieces were created to show the beauty of the natural world and how we are all at fault for the destruction of this world around us. To inform people of all the destruction we are causing just by living. However, there is hope. Around the world there are countries changing their way of life to protect the world they have and to improve it for those to come. Everyone is at fault. But this also means that everyone can be the positive change we need to see in the world. Even if the change is only small steps, it is still something and will make a difference. We need to be more human-kind and less human not-so kind.

“Human Not So Kind” will be on display in the Mueller Gallery through the summer. To make an appointment to see the exhibition, contact Professor Suzanne Baron at sbaron@caldwell.edu.

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Caldwell University Celebrates 77th Commencement

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Caldwell University celebrates 77th commencement

Former secretary of higher education Rochelle Hendricks receives honorary degree

Caldwell, N.J., May 19, 2019 – Caldwell University celebrated its 77th annual commencement Sunday, May 19 awarding degrees to 467 graduates.

Marisa Castronova of Nutley, New Jersey, delivered the student address at the graduate commencement ceremony. She advised her fellow graduates to consider the person who earned the degree and to remember that he or she is the driving force behind the degree. “A degree is not a living entity…It can’t walk, it can’t talk.” Castronova, who received her doctorate in educational leadership in December, said, “Consider you, the person who earned it. Consider you, the person who decided to embark on an educational trek requiring hard work, dedication and sacrifice.”  She encouraged graduates to take time to reflect on what they have learned about themselves. “For knowing who you are and what you are capable of will enable you to transform knowledge into something great.” Castronova is a science educator at Robert L. Lazar Middle School in Montville, New Jersey.

Kathryn Marano, also of Nutley, delivered the undergraduate commencement ceremony address. She suggested to graduates that they are all “rocket scientists” who have been building rocket ships that will lift off when they leave the auditorium. Utilizing the image of the rocket ship, Marano said the classes they took were the framework of the ship, while the attributes they learned at Caldwell including kindness, resilience, integrity and respect would help  them navigate the rocket ship “through tough and uncharted territory.” The most important components of the rocket ship are the team of professors, classmates and staff whose guidance students will take with them after graduation, she said. “With the rocket ship complete, we are ready to take on the world, and I am confident that we will be the pioneers of the future and successful in whatever paths we choose.” Marano will receive a Bachelor of Science degree in business administration with minors in small business entrepreneurship and marketing in August.

An honorary degree was awarded to Rochelle Hendricks who served as the first secretary of higher education for the state of New Jersey from 2011 to 2018. She encouraged the graduates to imagine the world the way they would like it to be and to let the light of God shine through them as they strive to make the world a better and brighter place.   “As you make a living, be sure to make a life,” and remember the values that are timeless and transcendent, she said.

Members of Caldwell’s class of 1969, marking their 50th anniversary, were recognized.

President Nancy H. Blattner, Ph.D., presented doctoral students with their Ph.D.s and Ed.D.s, graduate students with their Master of Arts, Master of Business Administration or Master of Science degrees and undergraduates with their Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, Bachelor of Fine Arts or Bachelor of Science in nursing degrees.   A Master of Science in Accounting degree was awarded posthumously to Kelly Marilly Gonzalez. Her brother accepted the degree from Dr. Blattner.

President Blattner told the graduates that it was a day of great joy and pride for them, their family members and loved ones who supported them. She said the university was “sending you forward, not just as graduates, but as people who we expect to make a difference.” She advised them to stay connected to their alma mater that has “not only been your learning community but also your family for four years.” Each student, she said, “has made an indelible impression on me.”

Laurita Warner, chair of the Board of Trustees and alumna, said some things at Caldwell never change like a welcoming environment, dedicated and caring faculty, “an administration who work tirelessly to provide a campus where students can thrive and learn, and the mission inspired by Saint Dominic and our Catholic tradition to prepare students to think critically, pursue truth and contribute to a just society. And friendships that last a lifetime.” She extended two wishes to each of the graduates, “the gift of memories of Caldwell University as fond as mine are and the very best future life has to offer.”

Undergraduate and master’s students wore gowns made from 100 percent post-recycled plastic bottles.

 

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Sport management students host event to support business professor’s nonprofit for education in India

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Caldwell, N.J., May 14, 2019 – Students in Business Professor Neil Malvone’s Sports Event Management class and in the Sport Management Club hosted a nightfall volleyball event to support Pawel’s Children which improves education in India. The non-profit organization was founded by Business Professor Monika Sywak in honor of her son.  

Malvone said the students were thrilled to create the event to help Pawel’s Children.  

Each semester, the event management students create an event from ideation to implementation as a way to learn the course material in an experiential fashion. They handle all aspects of the event including finding participants, sponsors, and bringing in spectators, as well as the event logistics,” said Malvone.  

Sywak is grateful to Malvone and the students for their support. The founding of the Pawel’s Children goes back to 2014 when Sywak says the organization “found her” and it was love at first sight. They support the Abhaneri School in an impoverished area of India that Sywak “stumbled on” during a sightseeing trip with her friends Shalini Madaras and Denise Walsh.     

They were distributing soccer balls in a rural area of Rajasthan when they stopped at the Abhaneri School. They saw that 300 children were learning in a structure with dirt floors, no running water, no bathrooms or electricity, and unstable walls. After leaving the kids that day, Sywak says, she could not stop thinking about them, “how special they were and how much they really wanted to learn.” Even with a language barrier and her friend’s translation, Sywak could feel how “sincere, humble and genuine” the people were and could see they “had a real  love for education.”

“They just needed a little help to take it further,” says Sywak, who teaches undergraduate and graduate finance and ethical business strategy courses. She and her friends decided to start with a small project, financing the construction of bathrooms. They suggested making the donations in memory of Sywak’s son, Pawel, who had died in 2012 at 20 years old. As they started spreading the word,  they could see there was support for the project. Soon after, they applied for the nonprofit status and Pawel’s Children was born.

Alumni News, Featured News, News

Caldwell University Unveils Multicultural Center Named for first African American Student

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Caldwell, N.J., May 10, 2019 – Caldwell University unveiled its new multicultural center on Thursday, May 9.  The Eileen Jones Multicultural Center is named after Eileen Jones, Esq. ’57, the first African American student to attend and graduate from Caldwell University.

President Nancy H. Blattner, Ph.D., OPA welcomed friends of Jones, alumni, students, staff, faculty and other guests to the dedication and official opening.

“In recognition of all the wonderful cultures that make up the Caldwell University family, this center will serve as a resource for the promotion of multicultural awareness, understanding and appreciation,” said Blattner. “In the spirit of our core values of Respect, Integrity, Community, and Excellence, this will be a place where a variety of programs and events are hosted with the goal of a creating a learning community.”

Blattner explained that Jones earned her B.A. in social studies from Caldwell and then went on to earn a J.D. from St. John’s University School of Law. In 1977, Jones was the first woman appointed chief of the administrative review staff for compensation and pension at the Veterans Administration Central Office in Washington, D.C.  In 1981, she returned to Newark and became the assistant director for the Veterans Administration.  Among the many honors she received, Jones was one of three inaugural recipients of the Caldwell Veritas Award in 1986, an annual award given to celebrate professional excellence of Caldwell alumni.

“Eileen was a smart and motivated woman, and a trailblazer in many ways,” said Blattner.  “Eileen was kind, funny, and warm, and had an infectious smile and really good sense of humor.”

Jones was involved in the community, holding executive positions at the Arts Council of Orange and the Orange Community Advisory Board, and was she also involved with the Newark Museum, the Civic Action League, and Caldwell’s EOF Program.

A lifetime supporter of Caldwell University, in 2015, Jones established a scholarship to help high achieving students with financial need.  Before her passing in January 2019, she donated a gift of property to the university with the intention that the proceeds of its sale be used to establish a multicultural center on campus.

Angela Zaccardi, also an alumna, said she and Jones met when they were both at what was then Caldwell College for Women. They “remained friends forever…she was a great lady and very thorough,” said Zaccardi.

Maud Carroll and her daughter Denise Carroll were among the guests thrilled to be celebrating the dedication.   Maud remembers teaching music to Eileen beginning when she was eight years old and to her sister who became an accomplished musician.    Anna Layton, of East Orange, New Jersey, who met Jones back in the 1940s, was also happy to be at the celebration.  “Eileen was always there for me.”  Also attending was Ernestine Polhill, of Orange, New Jersey, who said that before Jones passed away they had talked about attending the Center dedication together.  “I wouldn’t have missed this for anything.”

The opening prayer was given by student Dennis Martin of the class of 2021.

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Professor Rosa Sanchez Chosen to Participate in Seminar on Ancient Greece

Caldwell, N.J., May 9, 2019 – Caldwell University is pleased to announce that Rosa Sanchez, associate professor of Spanish language, literature, and culture, Professor Rosa Sanchez Headshotis one of a select group of faculty members nationwide chosen by the Council of Independent Colleges (CIC) and Harvard University’s Center for Hellenic Studies to participate in an Ancient Greece in the Modern Classroom seminar, “The Ancient Greek Hero.”

CIC and the Center for Hellenic Studies recently selected 20 faculty members out of 42 highly competitive nominations to participate in the seminar, which will take place July 25–29, 2019, at Harvard University’s Center for Hellenic Studies campus in Washington, DC. Gregory Nagy, Francis Jones Professor of Classical Greek Literature and professor of comparative literature at Harvard University, and Kenneth Scott Morrell, associate professor of Greek and Roman studies at Rhodes College, will lead the seminar. The program is generously funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

“Strengthening the teaching of the classics at colleges and universities is of critical importance. This seminar series addresses the challenge of keeping alive in undergraduate education classical texts that generations ago were read and understood by every college graduate,” said CIC President Richard Ekman. “We believe that Dr. Rosa Sanchez will contribute to the seminar in meaningful ways and learn much that will energize teaching when she returns home.”

Sanchez teaches Greek literature in her Spanish and Latin American literature courses. Dr. Barbara Chesler, Caldwell University’s vice president for academic affairs, is delighted for Sanchez and how the seminar will align with Sanchez’s research and teaching.  Chesler pointed out that in Sanchez’s Spanish and Latin American Literature class she teaches how Aristotle’s “Poetics” influenced the Spanish Enlightenment movement. “Through discussion, students discover the core issues of antiquity and how they are still the same in modern society.  This amazes the Generation Z student,” said Chesler.  “This seminar will assist Dr. Sanchez in pursuing the Greek “hero” and various Greek writers in-depth with other scholars and will provide the opportunity for her to further study the Greek hero in poetry, history, and philosophy.”

Designed primarily for non-specialists, the seminar will explore what it means to be human. The organizing principle will be the study of a model of humanity, the h?r?s (hero), as it can be reconstructed by way of textual evidence attesting to myths and rituals from throughout the ancient Greek-speaking world. Beginning with the Homeric poems, the seminar also will engage with works of Sappho, Herodotus, Hesiod, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, and Plato, providing participants who teach in a variety of disciplines with approaches to integrate the literature of ancient Greece into a wide range of courses.

For more than ten years, CIC has collaborated with the Center for Hellenic Studies to provide seminars on teaching the classics for small and mid-sized independent colleges that have a limited number of faculty members or courses in the classics. The seminar is ideal for faculty members who have been trained in other disciplines and who seek opportunities to explore major classical texts and learn new ways to teach these texts to undergraduates.

For more information, visit the CIC website at www.cic.edu/AncientGreece.  

Participants in 2019 CIC-Center for Hellenic Studies Seminar

Sarah Blackwell, Instructor of English, Thomas More University (KY)

Dan Clanton, Associate Professor of Philosophy and Religious Studies, Doane University (NE)

Morgan Dancy, Instructor of English, Methodist University (NC)

Ellen Dugan-Barrette, Professor of English, Brescia University (KY)

Chris Flynn, Associate Professor of English, St. Edward’s University (TX)

Erich Freiberger, Professor of Philosophy and Public Policy, Jacksonville University (FL)

Guadalupe Garcia McCall, Assistant Professor of English, George Fox University (OR)

Jeffrey Glodzik, Associate Professor of History, D’Youville College (NY)

Brian Harries, Associate Professor of English, Concordia University Wisconsin (WI)

Pamela Johnston, Associate Professor of History, Fresno Pacific University (CA)

Sigrid King, Professor of English, Carlow University (PA)

Sean Lewis, Associate Professor of English, Mount St. Mary’s University (MD)

Paula Makris, Associate Professor of English, Wheeling Jesuit University (WV)

Gretchen McKay, Professor of Art History, McDaniel College (MD)

James Pollock, Professor of English, Loras College (IA)

Irina Rodimtseva, Assistant Professor of Literature and Writing,

Alderson Broaddus University (WV)

Rosa Mirna Sanchez, Associate Professor of Spanish Language, Literature, and Culture,

Caldwell University (NJ)

James Snyder, Associate Professor of Philosophy, Mercyhust University (PA)

Kerri Tom, Professor of English, Concordia University Irvine (CA)

Kristen Waha, Assistant Professor of English, Grove City College (PA)

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About Caldwell University

Caldwell University is a private, Catholic coed four-year university with a strong liberal arts core curriculum that enhances critical thinking and analytical reasoning. Caldwell offers 31 undergraduate and 31 graduate programs, including doctoral, master’s, certificate and certification programs, as well as online and distance learning options that prepare students for today’s global marketplace. The university has 15 NCAA Division II intercollegiate sports programs and a football program that is a member of the Collegiate Sprint Football League.

Caldwell offers numerous clubs, fraternities, sororities and activities. It is located on a beautiful 70-acre campus in suburban Caldwell, New Jersey. Caldwell was founded by the Sisters of Saint Dominic of Caldwell. Its core values of respect, integrity, community and excellence influence academic and campus life. For more information about Caldwell University, visit caldwell.edu.

The Council of Independent Colleges (CIC) is an association of 769 nonprofit independent colleges and universities, state-based councils of independent colleges, and other higher education affiliates, that works to support college and university leadership, advance institutional excellence, and enhance public understanding of independent higher education’s contributions to society. CIC is the major national organization that focuses on services to leaders of independent colleges and universities and state-based councils. CIC offers conferences, seminars, publications, and other programs and services that help institutions improve educational quality, administrative and financial performance, student outcomes, and institutional visibility. CIC conducts the largest annual conferences of college and university presidents and of chief academic officers in the United States. Founded in 1956, CIC is headquartered at One Dupont Circle in Washington, DC. For more information, visit www.cic.edu.

Harvard University’s Center for Hellenic Studies, located in Washington, DC, was founded by means of an endowment made “exclusively for the establishment of an educational center in the field of Hellenic Studies designed to rediscover the humanism of the Hellenic Greeks.” This humanistic vision remains the driving force of the Center for Hellenic Studies. The Center brings together a variety of research and teaching interests centering on Hellenic civilization in the widest sense of the term “Hellenic.” This concept encompasses the evolution of the Greek language and its culture as a central point of contact for all the different civilizations of the ancient Mediterranean world. Interaction with foreign cultures, including the diffusion of Roman influence, is an integral part of this concept.

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President Blattner and other NJ university leaders send letter to NJ congressional delegation on immigration

Caldwell, N.J. – May 3, 2019 – Caldwell University President Nancy Blattner joined presidents and chancellors of other New Jersey colleges and universities in a letter to the New Jersey congressional delegation regarding immigration and international students, faculty and scholars.

The letter is below.

May 2, 2019

Honorable Members of the New Jersey Congressional Delegation:

As presidents and chancellors of colleges and universities throughout New Jersey, we are writing to express our concern about obstacles we are facing in our efforts to attract and retain international students, faculty, and scholars.  Our schools vary in mission, size and the makeup of our student bodies, but we all depend on our ability to attract motivated students and scholars from throughout society and around the world.  We believe our success in these endeavors plays an important role in building the State’s innovation economy.

Over the past several years, we have observed a disturbing increase in the number – and length – of impediments put in the path of our international students, faculty, and staff.  Some of our schools have experienced decreases in foreign student enrollment and all of our schools have encountered an increasingly log-jammed immigration system that is impacting our ability to recruit, retain, and bring to our campuses foreign talent.

Simply put, as it becomes more difficult for foreign students and academics to study and work in the United States, many of them are turning to other options, weakening not just our individual institutions, but American higher education as a whole, and, by extension, our country’s global competitiveness.

Some examples:

  • Administrative processing delays: In a number of recent cases, graduate students and faculty members have been forced to miss or defer entire semesters because their visa applications were mired in “administrative processing” at the State Department. Administrative processing is the time period outside of “normal” processing times in which cases that appear to meet the basic eligibility requirements are referred for additional background checks.  Visa applicants are generally not provided with any explanations, nor are they told how long the additional processing may last.  This situation creates untenable uncertainty for the visa applicant, the employer, and other affected parties, especially as anecdotal reports indicate an increase in the amount of time that cases are remaining in this category.  This can be especially problematic for foreign students and academics, whose commitments in the U.S. align with an established academic calendar.
  • Processing delays for Optional Practical Training: Optional Practical Training (OPT) permits foreign students studying in the U.S. to apply for “practical training” with a U.S. employer in a job directly related to their course of study. The program allows students to supplement their education with valuable experiential learning and on-the-job-training as they start their careers.  Unfortunately, processing times for OPT applications have increased from a previous maximum of 90 days in 2016 to 3½ – 5½months today.  Processing times in this range create an enormous burden for students.  The consequence of these delays is that students are unable to begin their job or program on time and, in many instances, they may lose out on the position altogether.  This harms not only the students, but also the employers seeking to hire qualified, U.S.-trained workers for a practical training opportunity.
  • Increased Requests for Evidence: Over the past year, employers seeking to hire foreign-born employees have seen a dramatic increase in the number of “Requests for Evidence” (RFEs) from United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), particularly for H-1B visas, which allow U.S. employers to hire highly-skilled foreign workers in specialty occupations. We understand that USCIS has a responsibility to ensure that it has necessary information about eligibility; we do not doubt that some of these requests are warranted.  The scope of the increase, however, is staggering.  RFEs for H-1B visa petitions more than doubled between the third and fourth quarters of FY 2017.  These requests delay the issuance of visas for employers by months and boost legal costs.  Meanwhile, our professors and other employees are putting their lives on hold as they wait for start-dates.

The types of situations described above rarely make front-page news and the isolated impact of each example is certainly not as dramatic as the effect of higher-profile actions such as the rescission of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program or the travel ban.  However, taken together, they create a frustrating and sometimes hostile environment for those wishing to live in and contribute to our communities.  This cumulative effect is acutely felt at our colleges and universities, where we depend on the free flow of talent to help fulfill our teaching and research missions.

Our experiences over the past several years are reflected in the findings of two recent reports by the American Immigration Lawyers Association (AILA) and the Council of Graduate Schools (CGS).  The AILA analysis of USCIS data found that the total time it takes the federal government to process foreign visas has increased by 46 percent over the past two fiscal years.  Meanwhile, the Council of Graduate Schools found that new enrollments of international students at U.S. graduate schools have fallen for the second year in a row.  The CGS report comes on top of a 2018 survey by the Institute of International Education, which found that new foreign student enrollment for undergraduate programs in the U.S. has decreased by 8.9 percent since the 2015-16 school year.

Needless to say, we are very concerned about the findings in these reports.  For decades, U.S. academia has been the envy of the world, in part because of our recruitment and acceptance of the finest applicants from around the globe.  It has also been an engine of American innovation, bringing together talent from across the nation and around the world to work on the discoveries that fuel our most cutting-edge economic sectors.  Our students, both foreign and U.S.-born, are able to learn from the world’s best professors and conduct research under the tutelage of the most creative minds in their field.  These students, in turn, join the workforce, enter public service, and become educators or researchers themselves.  Eventually, their children attend our colleges and universities, and become productive members of society.

As the 116th Congress moves forward, we ask that you closely monitor the policies and administrative actions that are threatening the free flow of students and scholars upon which our colleges and universities depend.  We appreciate all your work on these issues and hope that you will continue to let foreign-born individuals on our campuses and throughout the State know that people of all backgrounds and nationalities will always be welcome in New Jersey.

Sincerely,

Richard A. Levao
President
Bloomfield College

Rosalind Reichard
Interim President
Centenary University

Helen J. Streubert
President
College of Saint Elizabeth

Christopher A. Capuano, Ph.D.
President
Fairleigh Dickinson University

Dr. Joseph R. Marbach
President
Georgian Court University

Grey J. Dimenna
President
Monmouth University

Sue Henderson
President
New Jersey City University

Christopher L. Eisgruber
President
Princeton University

Nancy H. Blattner, Ph.D.
President
Caldwell University

Kathryn A. Foster
President
College of New Jersey

MaryAnn Baenninger
President
Drew University

Anne M. Prisco, Ph.D.
President
Felician University

Dawood Farahi, Ph.D.
President
Kean University

Susan A. Cole, Ph.D.
President
Montclair State University

Joel S. Bloom
President
New Jersey Institute of Technology

Peter P. Mercer
President
Ramapo College

Gregory G. Dell’Omo
President
Rider University

Robert Barchi
President
Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey

Robert Barchi
President
Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey

Nancy Cantor
Chancellor
Rutgers University–Newark

Eugene J. Cornacchia
President
St. Peter’s University

Harvey Kesselman
President
Stockton University

Richard J. Helldobler
President
William Paterson University

Ali A. Houshmand
President
Rowan University

Brian L. Strom, M.D., M.P.H.
Chancellor
Rutgers Biomedical and Health Sciences

Christopher J. Molloy
Chancellor
Rutgers University–New Brunswick

Mary J. Meehan, Ph.D.
Interim President
Seton Hall University

Nariman Farvardin
President
Stevens Institute of Technology

Merodie A. Hancock, Ph.D.
President
Thomas Edison State University

CC: The Honorable Philip D. Murphy
Governor of New Jersey

 

 

 

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More than 200 Caldwell students present projects at Research and Creative Arts Day

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Research Astrophysicist Presents on Science and Faith in Harmony: The Heavens Declare the Glory of God”

Caldwell, N.J., April 29, 2019 – More than 200 students presented their projects at Caldwell University’s third annual Research and Creative Arts Day. This year’s theme was “Ut in Omnibus Glorificetur Dei— That in All Things God May Be Glorified.”

The event’s opening featured a performance of “All Good Gifts” from “Godspell” by the cast of the Music Department’s Opera Musical Theatre Workshop.

President Nancy Blattner read nineteenth-century poet Gerard Manley Hopkins’s sonnet “God’s Grandeur,” which celebrates the “ever-present magnificence of God’s creation” and, she said, beautifully mirrored the theme of the research day. The challenge, said Blattner, is for “each of us in the audience to become more alive to God’s presence—whether that revelation be made to you through the beauty found in nature and art or through the discoveries revealed in the realm of science.”

Dr. Barbara Chesler, vice president for academic affairs, explained that the annual event provides an opportunity for students to display the work they have done throughout the year. The students are mentored by faculty and “go in as a novice and come out as an expert.” In the process, she said, they learn about communication, collaboration, problem solving, critical thinking, teamwork and time management.

The keynote speaker was Dr. Anton M. Koekemoer, research astrophysicist at the Space Telescope Science Institute, who spoke on “Science and Faith in Harmony: The Heavens Declare the Glory of God.” In introducing Koekemoer, Dr. Darryl Aucoin, an assistant professor in the Natural Sciences Department, said, “Dr. Koekemoer has worked to take us deeper into the universe than we have ever seen, and in doing so takes us back in time to the early days of the cosmos.”

Koekemoer, who has carried out scientific research with the Hubble Space Telescope for over 20 years with a focus on distant galaxies and black holes, presented a journey of exploration through the cosmos, highlighting exciting astronomical discoveries and images from the telescope that inspired beautiful artwork in The Saint John’s Bible. He pointed to the sense of awe and wonder expressed by ancient writers of Scripture—like the psalmist, who exclaims, “The heavens declare the glory of God”—and said this sense grows when viewing the universe with modern telescopes. Koekemoer’s presentation was part of the university’s “Year with The Saint John’s Bible.” The sacred work is the first handwritten, illuminated Bible of monumental scale in 500 years.

After the presentation, students displayed their poster presentations and projects to judges and visitors.

Amelia Biswas, a biology and psychology major, focused on the “Evaluation of Garlic and Thieves Oil as Treatments of Leprosy.” Growing up in Bangladesh, she saw many people suffering from leprosy. As a child, she wanted to do something to help people with the disease but could not. When the opportunity to do research arose in college, she said, “Let’s use this platform and try to do something.” It was her first research project. “I grew up through the process and gained a better understanding of scientific research.”

Jaclyn Berman, a senior in the School of Nursing and Public Health, researched the effect of music therapy on postoperative relief. Concerned about the opioid crisis, she wanted to do research on alternative therapies. She found that music therapy reduced pain and therefore reduced the need for pain medication. She hopes hospitals will implement similar plans for pain management after surgeries.

Stefanie Konboz and Romina Ghale, biology majors, looked at “The Study of Antimutagenic Properties of Emblica officinalis and Annona muricata.” They researched whether amla fruit and graviola would exhibit anticancer properties. Konboz thoroughly enjoyed the project work and appreciated all she learned from Aucoin and Associate Professor Agnes Berki. “I’ve always asked questions, and the research was a learning process every day,” she said.

Holly Reiter, a senior graphic design major, showcased her senior exhibition “Alive Again,” which featured her digital paintings, inspired by music. “It made me realized I want to be an illustrator for the rest of my life as my career.”

The keynote for the graduate section of the day was given by Humberto Humby Baquerizo on “Translating Leadership, Resilience and Community Service in Scholarship.” Baquerizo received a doctorate in education leadership from Caldwell and works at Rutgers Medical School in the Office for Diversity and Community Engagement.

Jhoanna Marquez, an academic advisor at Caldwell, did research on students placed on academic probation. Her research focused on the extent to which semester meetings with advisors increased the motivation to improve academic standing as perceived by students on probation. Since she has been working with this population for some time in her position at Caldwell, she was pleased to see that the connection with the recovery advisor improved the outcomes for students in areas such as study habits and awareness of campus resources and also helped with retention.

Marjorie O’Connell, a graduate student in the Education Division literacy program, focused on the question “Can the Use of Brain Games Improve Working Memory and Reading Comprehension for Students in a Middle School Special Education Setting?” She teaches study skills in a resource room for seventh- and eighth-graders and was very pleased to see from her study that executive functioning, which are self-regulation skills, as well as behavior and reading comprehension improved for this population with the games. “I can’t wait to hit the ground running with it next year,” she said.

Courtney Kane, Christopher Colasurdo and Shariq Khan, graduate students in the applied behavior analysis program, looked at “Vocational Skills Assessment for a Young Adult with Autism Spectrum Disorder.” “This was right up my alley,” said Kane, a graduate assistant in the Center for Autism and Applied Behavior Analysis, who wants to work with young adults with autism spectrum disorder when she graduates. They replicated a previous study to determine the vocational skills that their learner had in his repertoire. In future work, they plan to teach the skills he did not demonstrate.

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Caldwell Offering Fully Online Master’s in Nursing in Population Health

Caldwell, N.J., April 26, 2019– Caldwell University’s School of Nursing and Public Health is offering a new fully online Master of Science in Nursing program in Population Health for fall 2019, the first of its kind in New Jersey.

“We are delighted to be able to offer this 36-credit innovative population health program,” said Dr. Donna Naturale, RN, APN-BC, CDE, assistant professor and coordinator of the program. “It will prepare nurses to meet the demands of health care today and tomorrow by promoting healthier communities and addressing needs associated with the social determinants of health, commonly attributed to the zip codes in which we live and work.” The social determinants of health include factors such as access to health care, finances and income, transportation, housing, social support, and level of education.

Graduates of the program will be prepared to serve as leaders in nursing and health care. They will be qualified to work in a number of positions within a variety of health care systems in positions that include care coordinator, project, case and nurse managers in outpatient facilities, hospitals, public health departments, and within insurance and quality improvement fields. Upon graduation, they will also be qualified to teach in undergraduate nursing programs.  Students will integrate technology utilizing healthcare data to identify trends and issues associated with the overall health of populations.

 

They will also learn to provide high-quality nursing care, promote health, and prevent diseases that may be linked to the social determinants of health.

The MSN in Population Health was planned and developed in response to the Institute of Medicine report “Primary Care and Public Health: Exploring Integration to Improve Population Health.”

It addresses needs which are identified in the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation “Future of Nursing 2020-2030” report. “The academic program will aim to prepare nurses to identify health disparities and works towards reducing those disparities which are influenced by social determinants of health working towards improving overall health and well-being for populations as we plan to care for the next generation,” Naturale says.

The program ties in with the mission of Caldwell University, a Catholic Dominican institution. “As the Catholic Health Association states, there is a ‘moral imperative for making a commitment to the people of our community and that our focus on social determinants of health is not only because it is necessary but also because it is just,’” explains Naturale.

For information on the program, contact the Caldwell University Admissions Office at 973-618-3500 or admissions@caldwell.edu or go to https://www.caldwell.edu/graduate/academic-department/graduate-programs-in-nursing/master-of-science-in-nursing-in-population-health .

Prospective students can apply to the program at www.caldwell.edu/applynow.

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Caldwell University Offering a Bachelor’s in eSports Management

Caldwell University student playing game in computer.Caldwell, N.J. – April 25, 2019 – Caldwell University is offering a new Bachelor of Science degree in eSports Management to prepare students for careers in the popular electronic sports gaming industry with opportunities for employment in finance, marketing, event planning, operations, and entertainment.

The program is one of the first of its kind in the nation and is being offered within Caldwell’s School of Business and Computer Science.  “This is an exciting undergraduate program that will focus on the world of esports from the business and sport side of the industry,” said Professor Virginia Rich, associate dean of the School of Business.  Courses will concentrate on digital marketing, esports management, entrepreneurial studies, event planning, operations, ethics, and the sociological impact of esports.  “This growing industry is in need of professionals with business acumen and we are happy that we will be able to provide students with an academic background focused on the esports marketplace,” said Rich.

Newzoo, a global provider of games and global analytics, estimates that the global eSports economy will reach $900 million in 2019, representing a 38% growth from 2018, with audience growth reaching 180 million in 2019.

The degree program is based in a Business School that is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs, ensuring rigorous academic curriculum and strong skills-based outcomes.

In fall 2019 Caldwell University is launching its first esports team.  In the spring 2019 semester, the university began offering an elective in esports within the Business School’s Sport Management major.

For information on the program, contact the Caldwell University Admissions Office at 973-618-3500 or admissions@caldwell.edu or go to 

https://www.caldwell.edu/academics/majors-minors/business/b-s-in-e-sports-management.

Prospective students can apply to the program at www.caldwell.edu/applynow.

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Research on a natural mosquito deterrent earns CU student Independent College Fund of New Jersey award

CU students Lamar receives Independent College Fund of New Jersey award

Student Lamar-Shea Chang was honored at the Independent College Fund of New Jersey Undergraduate Research Symposium . He is pictured here with Natural Sciences Department professors, Dr. Darryl Aucoin and Dr. Marjorie Squires.

Caldwell, N.J., April 10, 2019 – Premedical student Lamar-Shea Chang was honored March 18 at the Independent College Fund of New Jersey Undergraduate Research Symposium for his research titled “Convert every human into a natural mosquito deterrent.” Chang, who is also majoring in computer information systems with a concentration in business systems and minoring in chemistry, received honorable mention for his research, which focused on the growing problem of mosquitoes in many areas of the world and how humans are being exposed to some of the diseases the insects carry.

Chang pointed to scientific models such as the Coupled Global Climate Model and the Community Climate System Model that predict mosquitoes are progressively moving more north and more west in the United States and Canada. With the guidance of the faculty in the Natural Sciences Department, he tested plant oils to see how they could affect the general behavior of mosquitoes and if they could act as a deterrent. The oils he used were azadirachta indica (neem), andrographis paniculata (rice bitters) and aloe vera. His data revealed that when the mosquitoes were exposed to the oils extracted in the lab, they adjusted their behavioral patterns, no longer moving away from the area where the extracts were located.

He presented his findings at the Independent College Fund event at the Liberty Science Center; the event encourages students in the STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) fields. It was a thrill for Chang when he learned of his recognition. “I said, ‘Did they really call my name?’” Then he looked at the faces of his professors, including Dr. Marjorie Squires, his advisor, and knew by their smiles that he was in fact receiving the award.

Chang, a junior from the island of Jamaica who started his college career with several AP classes, is grateful that the Caldwell Natural Sciences Department provides students the opportunity to do research as undergraduates. He says his professors walked him through every step of the process.

Next semester Chang will be analyzing the economy of Jamaica for his CIS business systems concentration. He has set his sights on pursuing medical school, perhaps becoming a cardiothoracic surgeon. As he says, “More to come.”