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Caldwell University Named a College of Distinction

College of Distinction 2019-2020

Caldwell University has been named a 2019-2020 College of Distinction.The university has been recognized for its successful delivery of four distinctions—engaged students, great teaching, vibrant community and successful outcomes.

The university was also acknowledged with 2019-20 awards as Business College of Distinction,Education College of Distinction, Nursing College of Distinction and Catholic College of Distinction.

Stephen Quinn, acting vice president for enrollment management and communications, says the awards reaffirm areas of strength at Caldwell. “We are delighted to be acknowledged in areas where we are exemplary in serving our students and preparing them for the global marketplace.”

The university is offering a new Bachelor of Science degree in esports management and a new fully online Master of Science degree in nursing in population health; it is relaunching its Bachelor of Science degree in computer science.

About Colleges of Distinction: Colleges of Distinction has recognized and honored schools throughout the United States for excellence in undergraduate-focused higher education for over 15 years. The member schools within the Colleges of Distinction consortium distinguish themselves through their focus on the undergraduate experience. For more information, visit CollegesofDistinction.com.

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Health Sciences Grad Receives Phi Kappa Phi Fellowship for Medical School

 

Favour Garuba recipient of Phi Kappa Phi fellowship

Favour Garuba ’19 is the recipient of a Phi Kappa Phi fellowship. She will be attending Washington University School of Medicine in the fall on a full scholarship.

Recent graduate Favour Garuba is the recipient of a fellowship from the prestigious honor society Phi Kappa Phi.  PKP awards the grants to members who are starting their first year of graduate or professional study.  Garuba, who received her bachelor’s in health sciences May 19, will be entering Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis in the fall on a full scholarship.

Garuba was active in community service during her undergraduate years including spearheading the Phi Kappa Phi book drive for Autism Awareness month in April where students collected over 300 books for The Learning Center for Exceptional Children in Clifton, New Jersey.

She was thrilled when she found out that she was selected for fellowship. “Once I read the email, I felt grateful, honored, and humbled,” and she felt like a load was lifted off her shoulders, “All I could really say was ‘thank God.’”

Lynne Alleger, associate faculty member in the Academic Success Center and president of Caldwell’s chapter of PKP, worked closely with Garuba on the project.  “Even with mid-terms looming and graduation quickly approaching, Favour was always ready and willing to meet, make suggestions, and coordinate with our book drive recipient.”

Alleger is also proud of the other student leaders, Chennelle Lawrence, Roksana Korbi and Anwar Khalil for “their diligence in getting the book drive off the ground in a very short period of time and securing a very grateful recipient…all of the young women were more than motivated to meet with me and get the ball rolling on our agendas.”

Garuba, an international student from Nigeria, is grateful to the Phi Kappa Phi Chapter at Caldwell for nominating her, to the professors in the Natural  Sciences Department who wrote recommendation letters and to “the countless other individuals” at Caldwell who helped her achieve her goals.   She is looking forward to starting her medical studies so she can use her gifts to help those in need. “I would like to dedicate my services as a physician and researcher to improve health in a way that reaches every community, including those in disadvantaged areas.”

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Business Student’s Apprenticeship Provides In-depth Human Resources Training

“All schools should be making this a priority. It should be across the board,” says Caldwell University business student Crystal Zamora of her human resources apprenticeship program.  Zamora is the first federally registered human resources apprentice in the U.S. thanks to a partnership with the Employers Association of New Jersey.

Crystal Zamora

Zamora, who is majoring in business administration and minoring in human resources, has worked in HR for the Paper Mill Playhouse in Millburn, New Jersey where among her duties she assisted with payroll and planned a wellness program, and she is currently working in HR at Mott MacDonald, a national engineering firm in Iselin, New Jersey. “The companies I have had the honor of working with have given me such invaluable experiences,” she said.   The networking has been one of the highlights of the apprenticeship.  “There are so many professionals who are willing to help me.”

Apprenticeships are different than internships since students have the opportunity to work for two to three years immersing themselves in the business experiences.   John Sarno, president of EANJ, says most of the students, like Zamora, are the first in their families to attend college and they are “totally committed to their career development, working and attending classes full-time, a long-term commitment that requires the utmost endurance.”

Zamora, who will graduate in December and continue in Caldwell’s MBA program, is applying  concepts she learned in the classroom to “real life experiences” as she is exposed to areas of HR like the Affordable Care Act and Occupational Safety and Health Administration reporting, bargaining agreements, recruitment and promotion, and harassment issues.  EANJ has given her the opportunity to attend classes on human resources administration and law and compensation.

The US Department of Labor is promoting apprenticeships following the 2017 executive order to expand the programs. According to the US Department of Labor, nationally registered apprenticeships are becoming increasing available with reportedly 585,000 in 2018 compared with 375,000 in 2013. Graduates who have had apprenticeships are attractive to employers because they have on the job experience.

Sheila O’Rourke, Caldwell’s vice president of institutional effectiveness and member of EANJ’s board, is happy that Caldwell is one of the first to embrace this way of giving students more in-depth work experiences. “Crystal worked in our Human Resources office at Caldwell University before she started her apprenticeship.  There, I had the pleasure of getting to know her, and to witness firsthand her eagerness to learn and her strong work ethic.  Crystal will be an asset to any HR office lucky enough to employ her.”

Zamora recommends apprenticeships to students in any majors for their personal and professional development. “I hope more of these apprenticeship programs come to life,” she said, because it gives students solid experience and “enhances the connection” between class instruction and the field work.

Virginia Rich, associate dean of the School of Business and Computer Science, says the program is a terrific opportunity for employers to groom a potential employee to meet their firm’s unique needs and is one of the best active learning experiences a student could have. “Through industry experience, the lessons we teach in the classroom are reinforced in a tremendously meaningful way. And the employers benefit from the valuable work apprentices provide.”

Zamora is grateful to Rich and business faculty member Helen McGowan for introducing her to the program. “They have guided me throughout the entire experience.” She knows it has put her on the right path. “I have realized this is something I would love to do and a career I could see myself happy in.”

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Dominican Preaching Conference Opens Students’ Eyes to “Wide, yet Connected World”

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Participants of the Dominican Preaching Conference
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Participants of the Dominican Preaching Conference
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Caldwell Students Volunteers for the Conference
Participants of the Dominican Preaching Conference
Participants of the Dominican Preaching Conference
Participants of the Dominican Preaching Conference

Caldwell, N.J., June 5, 2019 – Isabelle Pioch came away from the annual Dominican Preaching Conference full of ideas that she would like to bring back to her campus and incorporate into her own life.   From a service day to possibly visiting detention centers to focusing more on contemplation, Pioch is looking forward to taking what she learned and putting it into action.  The Siena Heights University student joined 35 other students from Dominican colleges and universities at Caldwell University May 21-26 to explore how the Catholic Dominican tradition can be a part of their everyday lives.  “I am also going to continue expressing my faith through my artworks and projects,” said Pioch, a graphic design major.  Madison Perry, a biology student at Caldwell, was happy to discover that “preaching is not just standing behind a pulpit but can be expressed through art forms and service.”

Speakers presented on topics such as the Saints of the Order, The Dominican Family, Preaching the Signs of the Times, Preaching Through Service and Preaching Through Art.  In “Saints of the Order,”  “St. Dominic” portrayed by Patrick Spedale, campus minister at St. Pius X High School in Houston, spoke about “holy preaching” and encouraged the students to see that there is “a great need for great preachers of truth today.” Dominicans “love to study and study to love,” he said, and it is important to have “the Bible in one hand and the iPad in the other in order to read the signs of the times.” Dominic was “destined to do great things in life in the name of Jesus Christ,” said Spedale, and he encouraged the students to do the same in striving for the best in their lives.

A session on social justice included topics such as immigration, climate change, human trafficking, economic justice, and peace and security. The students were encouraged to look for solutions for famine, war, prejudice, racism, and sexism through advocacy, fundraising, and by asking systemic questions and look for answers.

Perry enjoyed meeting other students from across the United States.  “Despite not being Catholic, this conference has helped me grow closer to God and I was happy to have met such an accepting community of students, mentors, and staff.”    It was an empowering conference, said Pioch, “and really opened my eyes to the wide, yet connected world around me.”

Sister Gina Fleming, O.P., executive director of the Dominican Youth Movement USA, was in awe of the participants’ energy and interactions.  “The future of our communities, our country, and our world is in the hands of these young people.” It was a privilege for her to share the Dominican charism with the students. “I have tremendous hope that they will make a difference with their lives.”

Caldwell’s director of campus ministry, Colleen O’Brien said it was a gift to see the students engage in their faith in more active ways.  “Our Caldwell students learned quite a bit and hopefully they will be able to carry this experience with them into their future. We look forward to putting some more Dominican values into practice this next school year.”

Dana McStowe, the campus ministry program coordinator, assisted in running the program. Caldwell student Kassandra Pardo also attended.

The Caldwell students who helped with set-up and other logistics were Brooke McPherson, Maria Lesniewski, Julianna Verso, Brittany Gaule, and Anthony Pineros.

 

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Recent Graduates are in Top One Percent of Business Undergraduates

Recent graduates Zulenny Reyes-Calderon and Aida Osmeni were recognized at the New Jersey Collegiate Business Administration Association honor society ceremony May 3. L to R: Caldwell Business Professor Bernard O’Rourke; adjunct at Caldwell and professor at Essex County College, Dr. Germaine Albuquerque; Reyes-Calderon and Aida Osmeni; Associate Dean of the School of Business and Computer Science Virginia Rich and Business Professor Monika Sywak

Recent graduates Zulenny Reyes-Calderon and Aida Osmeni were recognized at the New Jersey Collegiate Business Administration Association honor society ceremony May 3. L to R: Caldwell Business Professor Bernard O’Rourke; adjunct at Caldwell and professor at Essex County College, Dr. Germaine Albuquerque; Reyes-Calderon and Aida Osmeni; Associate Dean of the School of Business and Computer Science Prof. Virginia Rich and Business Professor Monika Sywak

Caldwell, N.J June 3, 2019 -Recent graduates Aida Osmeni and Zulenny Reyes-Calderon were recognized at the New Jersey Collegiate Business Administration Association honor society ceremony on Friday, May 3 at Middlesex County College. The top one percent of undergraduate students pursuing degrees in business are invited to join NJCBAA.

Osmeni received a Bachelor of Science degree with a double major in financial economics and math and Reyes-Calderon received a Bachelor of Science degree in business administration on May 19 at Caldwell’s commencement ceremony.

Dr. Virginia Rich, associate dean of the School of Business and Computer Science, says the School of Business is very proud of Osmeni and Reyes-Calderon. “We are delighted that our students’ hard work and dedication is recognized by the NJCBAA with this distinguished award.”

Osmeni is employed at Crum & Forster and Zulenny is working in her family’s business.

 

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“Human Not So Kind” Art Exhibition Focuses on Natural World, Beauty and Destruction

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Caldwell, N.J., May 20, 2019 – The Mueller Gallery at Caldwell University is featuring an exhibition focusing on the natural world and its beauty and raising awareness of how humanity is disrupting that beauty. “Human Not So Kind” was created by student Phoebe Schepacarter for her senior art project.

Schepacarter, who received her Bachelor Fine Arts degree on May 19, said the exhibition gave her a way to highlight issues that many people are not talking about related to nature and the environment.

The front room of the gallery features 14 different pieces representing the natural world. “These works feature seven different biome areas that focus on the natural beauty of each area. Contrasting the beauty of each of these landscapes, are multiple ways that humanity has negatively affected the natural world,” said Schepacarter of Franklinville, New Jersey. Each landscape piece has an informational panel that has five facts about the biome and a statement about the ways humanity is destroying the world.

The back room of the gallery focuses on the positives of what humanity is doing for the earth. “There is a nine foot tall mural that is a map of the world indicating how well each country is taking care of the world and there are 24 panels highlighting specific places where people are taking care of the world. The panels also provide recommendations on how people can alter their lifestyles to be more earth friendly,” explained Schepacarter.

“I hope to make people feel responsible and to create a wave of change, even if it is just small daily changes to improve the world we live in, as it is the only one we have and we are all responsible for the condition it is in,” said Schepacarter.

Schepacarter’s artist statement is:

It is human nature to believe we are not at fault. To believe that we are doing the right thing because it directly benefits us. Contrary to this belief not everything we do is right or just, but everything we do has a cause and effect. The world around us is constantly changing and we are all the cause. These pieces were created to show the beauty of the natural world and how we are all at fault for the destruction of this world around us. To inform people of all the destruction we are causing just by living. However, there is hope. Around the world there are countries changing their way of life to protect the world they have and to improve it for those to come. Everyone is at fault. But this also means that everyone can be the positive change we need to see in the world. Even if the change is only small steps, it is still something and will make a difference. We need to be more human-kind and less human not-so kind.

“Human Not So Kind” will be on display in the Mueller Gallery through the summer. To make an appointment to see the exhibition, contact Professor Suzanne Baron at sbaron@caldwell.edu.

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Caldwell University Celebrates 77th Commencement

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Caldwell University celebrates 77th commencement

Former secretary of higher education Rochelle Hendricks receives honorary degree

Caldwell, N.J., May 19, 2019 – Caldwell University celebrated its 77th annual commencement Sunday, May 19 awarding degrees to 467 graduates.

Marisa Castronova of Nutley, New Jersey, delivered the student address at the graduate commencement ceremony. She advised her fellow graduates to consider the person who earned the degree and to remember that he or she is the driving force behind the degree. “A degree is not a living entity…It can’t walk, it can’t talk.” Castronova, who received her doctorate in educational leadership in December, said, “Consider you, the person who earned it. Consider you, the person who decided to embark on an educational trek requiring hard work, dedication and sacrifice.”  She encouraged graduates to take time to reflect on what they have learned about themselves. “For knowing who you are and what you are capable of will enable you to transform knowledge into something great.” Castronova is a science educator at Robert L. Lazar Middle School in Montville, New Jersey.

Kathryn Marano, also of Nutley, delivered the undergraduate commencement ceremony address. She suggested to graduates that they are all “rocket scientists” who have been building rocket ships that will lift off when they leave the auditorium. Utilizing the image of the rocket ship, Marano said the classes they took were the framework of the ship, while the attributes they learned at Caldwell including kindness, resilience, integrity and respect would help  them navigate the rocket ship “through tough and uncharted territory.” The most important components of the rocket ship are the team of professors, classmates and staff whose guidance students will take with them after graduation, she said. “With the rocket ship complete, we are ready to take on the world, and I am confident that we will be the pioneers of the future and successful in whatever paths we choose.” Marano will receive a Bachelor of Science degree in business administration with minors in small business entrepreneurship and marketing in August.

An honorary degree was awarded to Rochelle Hendricks who served as the first secretary of higher education for the state of New Jersey from 2011 to 2018. She encouraged the graduates to imagine the world the way they would like it to be and to let the light of God shine through them as they strive to make the world a better and brighter place.   “As you make a living, be sure to make a life,” and remember the values that are timeless and transcendent, she said.

Members of Caldwell’s class of 1969, marking their 50th anniversary, were recognized.

President Nancy H. Blattner, Ph.D., presented doctoral students with their Ph.D.s and Ed.D.s, graduate students with their Master of Arts, Master of Business Administration or Master of Science degrees and undergraduates with their Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, Bachelor of Fine Arts or Bachelor of Science in nursing degrees.   A Master of Science in Accounting degree was awarded posthumously to Kelly Marilly Gonzalez. Her brother accepted the degree from Dr. Blattner.

President Blattner told the graduates that it was a day of great joy and pride for them, their family members and loved ones who supported them. She said the university was “sending you forward, not just as graduates, but as people who we expect to make a difference.” She advised them to stay connected to their alma mater that has “not only been your learning community but also your family for four years.” Each student, she said, “has made an indelible impression on me.”

Laurita Warner, chair of the Board of Trustees and alumna, said some things at Caldwell never change like a welcoming environment, dedicated and caring faculty, “an administration who work tirelessly to provide a campus where students can thrive and learn, and the mission inspired by Saint Dominic and our Catholic tradition to prepare students to think critically, pursue truth and contribute to a just society. And friendships that last a lifetime.” She extended two wishes to each of the graduates, “the gift of memories of Caldwell University as fond as mine are and the very best future life has to offer.”

Undergraduate and master’s students wore gowns made from 100 percent post-recycled plastic bottles.

 

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Sport management students host event to support business professor’s nonprofit for education in India

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Caldwell, N.J., May 14, 2019 – Students in Business Professor Neil Malvone’s Sports Event Management class and in the Sport Management Club hosted a nightfall volleyball event to support Pawel’s Children which improves education in India. The non-profit organization was founded by Business Professor Monika Sywak in honor of her son.  

Malvone said the students were thrilled to create the event to help Pawel’s Children.  

Each semester, the event management students create an event from ideation to implementation as a way to learn the course material in an experiential fashion. They handle all aspects of the event including finding participants, sponsors, and bringing in spectators, as well as the event logistics,” said Malvone.  

Sywak is grateful to Malvone and the students for their support. The founding of the Pawel’s Children goes back to 2014 when Sywak says the organization “found her” and it was love at first sight. They support the Abhaneri School in an impoverished area of India that Sywak “stumbled on” during a sightseeing trip with her friends Shalini Madaras and Denise Walsh.     

They were distributing soccer balls in a rural area of Rajasthan when they stopped at the Abhaneri School. They saw that 300 children were learning in a structure with dirt floors, no running water, no bathrooms or electricity, and unstable walls. After leaving the kids that day, Sywak says, she could not stop thinking about them, “how special they were and how much they really wanted to learn.” Even with a language barrier and her friend’s translation, Sywak could feel how “sincere, humble and genuine” the people were and could see they “had a real  love for education.”

“They just needed a little help to take it further,” says Sywak, who teaches undergraduate and graduate finance and ethical business strategy courses. She and her friends decided to start with a small project, financing the construction of bathrooms. They suggested making the donations in memory of Sywak’s son, Pawel, who had died in 2012 at 20 years old. As they started spreading the word,  they could see there was support for the project. Soon after, they applied for the nonprofit status and Pawel’s Children was born.

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Caldwell University Unveils Multicultural Center Named for first African American Student

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Caldwell, N.J., May 10, 2019 – Caldwell University unveiled its new multicultural center on Thursday, May 9.  The Eileen Jones Multicultural Center is named after Eileen Jones, Esq. ’57, the first African American student to attend and graduate from Caldwell University.

President Nancy H. Blattner, Ph.D., OPA welcomed friends of Jones, alumni, students, staff, faculty and other guests to the dedication and official opening.

“In recognition of all the wonderful cultures that make up the Caldwell University family, this center will serve as a resource for the promotion of multicultural awareness, understanding and appreciation,” said Blattner. “In the spirit of our core values of Respect, Integrity, Community, and Excellence, this will be a place where a variety of programs and events are hosted with the goal of a creating a learning community.”

Blattner explained that Jones earned her B.A. in social studies from Caldwell and then went on to earn a J.D. from St. John’s University School of Law. In 1977, Jones was the first woman appointed chief of the administrative review staff for compensation and pension at the Veterans Administration Central Office in Washington, D.C.  In 1981, she returned to Newark and became the assistant director for the Veterans Administration.  Among the many honors she received, Jones was one of three inaugural recipients of the Caldwell Veritas Award in 1986, an annual award given to celebrate professional excellence of Caldwell alumni.

“Eileen was a smart and motivated woman, and a trailblazer in many ways,” said Blattner.  “Eileen was kind, funny, and warm, and had an infectious smile and really good sense of humor.”

Jones was involved in the community, holding executive positions at the Arts Council of Orange and the Orange Community Advisory Board, and was she also involved with the Newark Museum, the Civic Action League, and Caldwell’s EOF Program.

A lifetime supporter of Caldwell University, in 2015, Jones established a scholarship to help high achieving students with financial need.  Before her passing in January 2019, she donated a gift of property to the university with the intention that the proceeds of its sale be used to establish a multicultural center on campus.

Angela Zaccardi, also an alumna, said she and Jones met when they were both at what was then Caldwell College for Women. They “remained friends forever…she was a great lady and very thorough,” said Zaccardi.

Maud Carroll and her daughter Denise Carroll were among the guests thrilled to be celebrating the dedication.   Maud remembers teaching music to Eileen beginning when she was eight years old and to her sister who became an accomplished musician.    Anna Layton, of East Orange, New Jersey, who met Jones back in the 1940s, was also happy to be at the celebration.  “Eileen was always there for me.”  Also attending was Ernestine Polhill, of Orange, New Jersey, who said that before Jones passed away they had talked about attending the Center dedication together.  “I wouldn’t have missed this for anything.”

The opening prayer was given by student Dennis Martin of the class of 2021.

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Professor Rosa Sanchez Chosen to Participate in Seminar on Ancient Greece

Caldwell, N.J., May 9, 2019 – Caldwell University is pleased to announce that Rosa Sanchez, associate professor of Spanish language, literature, and culture, Professor Rosa Sanchez Headshotis one of a select group of faculty members nationwide chosen by the Council of Independent Colleges (CIC) and Harvard University’s Center for Hellenic Studies to participate in an Ancient Greece in the Modern Classroom seminar, “The Ancient Greek Hero.”

CIC and the Center for Hellenic Studies recently selected 20 faculty members out of 42 highly competitive nominations to participate in the seminar, which will take place July 25–29, 2019, at Harvard University’s Center for Hellenic Studies campus in Washington, DC. Gregory Nagy, Francis Jones Professor of Classical Greek Literature and professor of comparative literature at Harvard University, and Kenneth Scott Morrell, associate professor of Greek and Roman studies at Rhodes College, will lead the seminar. The program is generously funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

“Strengthening the teaching of the classics at colleges and universities is of critical importance. This seminar series addresses the challenge of keeping alive in undergraduate education classical texts that generations ago were read and understood by every college graduate,” said CIC President Richard Ekman. “We believe that Dr. Rosa Sanchez will contribute to the seminar in meaningful ways and learn much that will energize teaching when she returns home.”

Sanchez teaches Greek literature in her Spanish and Latin American literature courses. Dr. Barbara Chesler, Caldwell University’s vice president for academic affairs, is delighted for Sanchez and how the seminar will align with Sanchez’s research and teaching.  Chesler pointed out that in Sanchez’s Spanish and Latin American Literature class she teaches how Aristotle’s “Poetics” influenced the Spanish Enlightenment movement. “Through discussion, students discover the core issues of antiquity and how they are still the same in modern society.  This amazes the Generation Z student,” said Chesler.  “This seminar will assist Dr. Sanchez in pursuing the Greek “hero” and various Greek writers in-depth with other scholars and will provide the opportunity for her to further study the Greek hero in poetry, history, and philosophy.”

Designed primarily for non-specialists, the seminar will explore what it means to be human. The organizing principle will be the study of a model of humanity, the h?r?s (hero), as it can be reconstructed by way of textual evidence attesting to myths and rituals from throughout the ancient Greek-speaking world. Beginning with the Homeric poems, the seminar also will engage with works of Sappho, Herodotus, Hesiod, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, and Plato, providing participants who teach in a variety of disciplines with approaches to integrate the literature of ancient Greece into a wide range of courses.

For more than ten years, CIC has collaborated with the Center for Hellenic Studies to provide seminars on teaching the classics for small and mid-sized independent colleges that have a limited number of faculty members or courses in the classics. The seminar is ideal for faculty members who have been trained in other disciplines and who seek opportunities to explore major classical texts and learn new ways to teach these texts to undergraduates.

For more information, visit the CIC website at www.cic.edu/AncientGreece.  

Participants in 2019 CIC-Center for Hellenic Studies Seminar

Sarah Blackwell, Instructor of English, Thomas More University (KY)

Dan Clanton, Associate Professor of Philosophy and Religious Studies, Doane University (NE)

Morgan Dancy, Instructor of English, Methodist University (NC)

Ellen Dugan-Barrette, Professor of English, Brescia University (KY)

Chris Flynn, Associate Professor of English, St. Edward’s University (TX)

Erich Freiberger, Professor of Philosophy and Public Policy, Jacksonville University (FL)

Guadalupe Garcia McCall, Assistant Professor of English, George Fox University (OR)

Jeffrey Glodzik, Associate Professor of History, D’Youville College (NY)

Brian Harries, Associate Professor of English, Concordia University Wisconsin (WI)

Pamela Johnston, Associate Professor of History, Fresno Pacific University (CA)

Sigrid King, Professor of English, Carlow University (PA)

Sean Lewis, Associate Professor of English, Mount St. Mary’s University (MD)

Paula Makris, Associate Professor of English, Wheeling Jesuit University (WV)

Gretchen McKay, Professor of Art History, McDaniel College (MD)

James Pollock, Professor of English, Loras College (IA)

Irina Rodimtseva, Assistant Professor of Literature and Writing,

Alderson Broaddus University (WV)

Rosa Mirna Sanchez, Associate Professor of Spanish Language, Literature, and Culture,

Caldwell University (NJ)

James Snyder, Associate Professor of Philosophy, Mercyhust University (PA)

Kerri Tom, Professor of English, Concordia University Irvine (CA)

Kristen Waha, Assistant Professor of English, Grove City College (PA)

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About Caldwell University

Caldwell University is a private, Catholic coed four-year university with a strong liberal arts core curriculum that enhances critical thinking and analytical reasoning. Caldwell offers 31 undergraduate and 31 graduate programs, including doctoral, master’s, certificate and certification programs, as well as online and distance learning options that prepare students for today’s global marketplace. The university has 15 NCAA Division II intercollegiate sports programs and a football program that is a member of the Collegiate Sprint Football League.

Caldwell offers numerous clubs, fraternities, sororities and activities. It is located on a beautiful 70-acre campus in suburban Caldwell, New Jersey. Caldwell was founded by the Sisters of Saint Dominic of Caldwell. Its core values of respect, integrity, community and excellence influence academic and campus life. For more information about Caldwell University, visit caldwell.edu.

The Council of Independent Colleges (CIC) is an association of 769 nonprofit independent colleges and universities, state-based councils of independent colleges, and other higher education affiliates, that works to support college and university leadership, advance institutional excellence, and enhance public understanding of independent higher education’s contributions to society. CIC is the major national organization that focuses on services to leaders of independent colleges and universities and state-based councils. CIC offers conferences, seminars, publications, and other programs and services that help institutions improve educational quality, administrative and financial performance, student outcomes, and institutional visibility. CIC conducts the largest annual conferences of college and university presidents and of chief academic officers in the United States. Founded in 1956, CIC is headquartered at One Dupont Circle in Washington, DC. For more information, visit www.cic.edu.

Harvard University’s Center for Hellenic Studies, located in Washington, DC, was founded by means of an endowment made “exclusively for the establishment of an educational center in the field of Hellenic Studies designed to rediscover the humanism of the Hellenic Greeks.” This humanistic vision remains the driving force of the Center for Hellenic Studies. The Center brings together a variety of research and teaching interests centering on Hellenic civilization in the widest sense of the term “Hellenic.” This concept encompasses the evolution of the Greek language and its culture as a central point of contact for all the different civilizations of the ancient Mediterranean world. Interaction with foreign cultures, including the diffusion of Roman influence, is an integral part of this concept.