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Library

New Digital Exhibit: “Christmas at Caldwell”

Christmas traditions have always been an important part of Caldwell’s history. Although the activities may have changed, students and staff have always gathered together to celebrate the Christmas festivities. The Caldwell University Archives’ new digital exhibit, “Christmas at Caldwell,” highlights these various traditions over the years, such as tree-trimming contests and plays, candlelight ceremonies, caroling, and the annual Christmas banquet. The photographs in the exhibit are from the 1940s through the 1970s.

The exhibit can be viewed at caldwelluniversityarchives.omeka.net. Stay tuned for more digital exhibits in the future!

Questions? Comments? Concerns? Please email Kim Lynch, Reference Services & Archives Librarian: kalynch@caldwell.edu

English News, Featured News, News

English Professor’s Poetry Anthology is Selected for National Book Club List

Professor of English Mary Ann Miller, Ph.D. has received national recognition as her anthology “St. Peter’s B-list: Contemporary Poems Inspired by the Saints”  (Ave Maria Presss) has been selected for America Magazine’s, The Catholic Book Club list.

The anthology is listed in the fall books special literary issue. The Catholic Book Club features book reviews and literary discussion from America Media.

Mary Ann Miller

“I am so happy for the opportunity to extend the visibility of the wonderful poets in this collection and to spread the word that Catholicism is fertile ground for contemporary poetry,” said Miller.

St. Peter’s B-list was published in 2014 and features over 100 contemporary American poems, written by 70 poets from across the United States, that contain references to canonized saints.

The voices in these poems are not the saints themselves, speaking from distant times and places.  They are very contemporary voices, both male and female, from a wide range of social, regional, and occupational circumstances, who remember a saint, often despite a pervasive sense of doubt, in the midst of the spiritual struggles of daily life.

Featured News, News

“The Saint John’s Bible: From the Middle Ages to the 21st Century” Lecture

Photo of Marie Mullaney“The Saint John’s Bible: From the Middle Ages to the 21st Century” will be presented by Marie Mullaney, Ph.D., professor of history at Caldwell, 4:30 p.m., Thursday, Nov. 14 in the Alumni Theatre. This lecture will explain how an understanding of medieval history can lead to a deeper appreciation of The Saint John’s Bible since its production is so intimately linked to the values, techniques, and lifestyles of the time.

Caldwell University is celebrating its Year with The Saint John’s Bible with events featuring music, poetry and history.

The Saint John’s Bible is the first illuminated, handwritten Bible of monumental size to be created in more than 500 years. It was commissioned by Benedictine Saint John’s Abbey and University in Collegeville, Minnesota and the creative director was Donald Jackson, senior scribe to Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth’s Crown Office. Caldwell is hosting the Heritage Edition of the Gospels and Acts volume of the Bible until the end of the calendar year.

English News

Caldwell University Commemorates the Third Edition of Presence: A Journal of Catholic Poetry by Colleen Brennan

Cover of 'Presence - A Journal of Catholic Poetry'

http://www.catholicpoetryjournal.com/presence-2019 

On April 18th, 2019, Caldwell University’s English Department hosted a poetry reading in the Westervelt Lecture Hall to commemorate the release of the third edition of Presence: A Journal of Catholic Poetry. According to Dr. Mary Ann Miller, the editor-in-chief of Presence, “The journal seeks to show the wide variety of ways God’s presence is communicated to and experienced by human beings and, in so doing, hopes to create a community of writers who recognize Catholicism as fertile ground for the flourishing of contemporary poetry” (http://www.catholicpoetryjournal.com/mission). The 2019 edition of the journal aptly contributes to its overarching mission of establishing community through writing due to its timely inclusion of poetry written by refugees. In partnership with the Faculty Commission of World Concerns, the English Department welcomed Arab American Book Award winner Gregory Orfalea and former Palestinian refugee and Professor Emeritus of American University in Cairo, Egypt Sharif Elmusa to read poems written by Syrian refugees, which were translated by Orfalea and Elmusa for this edition of Presence. Their translated works include “The Life of Photos” by Ibrahim Qa’duni, “A Door That Does Not Slap” by Wael al-Nassir, “Like a Bull Going Left & Right” by ‘Abir Abd al-Wahid, and “Life is Flight” by Lena ‘Atfa.

Featured News, News

Campus Community Puts Dominican Pillar of Service into Action at Caldwell Day

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Caldwell, N.J., Sept. 30, 2019 –  Some 200 students, faculty and staff headed out to nonprofits to volunteer for the 11th annual Caldwell Day 2019 on Friday, Sept. 27.

Each year, classes are canceled and the campus community puts into action the Catholic Dominic pillar of service.  The university partnered with 18 service sites to help with their needs.

This theme of the day focused on celebrating the life of Saint Martin de Porres  a Dominican lay brother known for his charity, humility and voluntary poverty in serving those on the margins.

We talked with some students about their experiences living out the pillar of service.


Aashutosh Khatiwada ‘23 

Major: Computer Information Systems

Where did you volunteer and what did you do? I volunteered at the Community Foodbank of New Jersey where our group packed up a total of 525 boxes of food.

Aashutosh Khatiwada ' 23 volunteered at the Community FoodBank of New Jersey

Aashutosh Khatiwada ‘ 23 volunteered at the Community FoodBank of New Jersey

What were the life lessons that came from your experience?  It made me think of the people who need the food and that we take food for granted.  I was shocked to learn that the food was going to working families who have one or two jobs but still struggle to make ends meet.  It helps put things into perspective and makes us aware of different problems in the world. After volunteering today at the foodbank, it gave me a sense of self-satisfaction, that someone somewhere feels the effect of our work. Someone does not have to stay hungry today. Someone can put food on their table.

Why is it important for the campus community to put community service into action?

Community service helps you build perspective and understand other human beings.  That is the only way we can live in a cohesive manner. Also, it helps students take a break. It was therapeutic; it gave me a chance to be there in the moment.  And you can ask yourself, “Is it all O.K.? Can you fix it? I can try my best.”


Aubrey Melville ‘20 volunteered visiting the elderly from St. Aloysius Parish.

Aubrey Melville ‘20 volunteered visiting the elderly from St. Aloysius Parish.

Aubrey Melville ‘20 

Major: Accounting

Where did you volunteer and what did you do? I volunteered visiting the elderly from St. Aloysius Parish in Caldwell with Sister Eleanor Uhl, O.P.

What was most rewarding about this experience? The elderly cheered us up. They made jokes and cracked us up and looked at us as their children or grandchildren.

Why is it important for the campus community to take time out to put community service into action? 

As an adult student, it is busy going to school. This experience brought me back to when I was a child and my mother would take us out to visit the elderly.  Whenever you go out to do something like this you believe you have a certain mission, and then it turns out to be a whole different reality.


De-Jane Grant  ‘22

Major: Business Administration and history

Where did you volunteer and what did you do?  I volunteered at the Op Shop Thrift Shop at St. Peter’s Episcopal Church in Essex Fells where we sorted donated items, put them on the shelves and added price tags and we redecorated some of the displays to make them appealing to customers.

What was most rewarding about this experience?

De-Jane Grant ‘22 and Cindy Herrera ‘22 volunteered at the Op Shop Thrift Shop.

De-Jane Grant ‘22 and Cindy Herrera ‘22 volunteered at the Op Shop Thrift Shop.

I came to a realization that just because something is old doesn’t mean it’s no longer good. Sorting through the various donated shoes, another student and I had to decide which shoes were still good to put on the shelves. When speaking to one of the employees she pointed to one shoe and she said that it may be old but it’s still clean and in good condition and to someone who can’t afford brand new shoes, this will be good and it’ll hold up for a little longer. It made me realize how I can take the brand new shoes that I have for granted.  After today, I realized that I need to appreciate all the clothes that I already have and how lucky I am to be able to have the things I do. Someone who can’t afford the things that I think are simple and inexpensive may not be able to imagine themselves owning these things.

Why is it important for the campus community to take time out to put community service into action?  It is inspiring. I had never volunteered before; I had always wanted to. It was eye-opening and now I want to do more.  I want to give back as much as I can.


Cindy Herrera ‘22 

Major: Criminal Justice major with a minor in Pre Law and Criminal Forensics

Where did you volunteer and what did you do?  I volunteered at the Op Shop Thrift Shop at St. Peter’s Episcopal Church in Essex Fells organizing and packing up the items that were donated.

What was most rewarding about this experience?  It was really nice to learn that after people donate the clothing, household items, etc. the shop sells them and they give the money to local charities.

Why is it important for the campus community to take time out to put community service into action? As students, we are focused on ourselves and our homework and we don’t take time to think of others; community service shows us there is a whole world out there and that one person can make a difference.


Jennifer Montejo ‘21

Major: Music education

Where did you volunteer and what did you do? I volunteered at the Arc of Essex County with children with Down Syndrome and other intellectual and developmental disabilities.   We helped the aides and played and interacted with the children.

Jennifer Montejo ‘21 volunteered at the Arc of Essex County.

Jennifer Montejo ‘21 volunteered at the Arc of Essex County.

What was most rewarding about this experience?  I love all children and it was wonderful to see how much care the staff members are giving the children to educate them and to help them grow according to their developmental abilities.

Why is it important for the campus community to take time out to put community service into action?  Everything you are studying comes together to help you help the next generation.  It is important to take advantage of this opportunity.  As an education major, it started me thinking about a special education certificate.


Caldwell Day is featured on Abc7’s Eyewitness News in its #BeKind campaign.

Watch it here