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Spring 2020 Courses

DR 203 MODERN & CONTEMP. DRAMA IN PERF
Instructor: M. Lindroth TR 1:00 PM-2:15 PM
Introduces students to modern and contemporary performance styles and conditions. Focuses on 4-5 scripts taken from a range of countries.

EN 101 THE PROCESS OF WRITING (3)
Instructor: S. Miller MW 3:00 PM-4:15 PM
Offers intensive work in generating ideas, organization, style, and mechanics for the development of college-level writing. Admission by assignment. Does not fulfill core requirement in English.

EN 111 COLLEGE WRITING (3)
A writing intensive course that develops students’ college-level writing competence; writing is taught as a process that entails a series of revisions through the completion of several short assignments and longer expository essays. Includes preparation of a research paper and instruction in MLA style. Introduces literary analysis, terminology, and technique by reading and interpreting literature that comprises various genres and represents diverse cultures.

EN 207 GLOBAL LITERATURE (3)
Instructor: T. Harney-Mahajan TF 11:30 AM-12:45 PM
Explores non-western and world literature from the beginning of the twentieth century to the present, including works from South Asia, Africa, and the Middle East.

EN 207 GLOBAL LITERATURE (3)
Instructor: T. Harney-Mahajan W 4:20 PM-6:50 PM
Explores non-western and world literature from the beginning of the twentieth century to the present, including works from South Asia, Africa, and the Middle East.

EN 221 WOMEN IN LITERATURE (3)
Instructor: K. Kornacki WF 1:00 PM-2:15 PM
Examines the construction of female images, roles and attitudes in literature by and about women from around the globe. We will examine the representation of gendered identity in a variety of genres (fiction, nonfiction, drama, and poetry) and historical periods with a central focus on modern and contemporary works.”

EN 226 PSYCH AND LITERATURE (3)
Instructor: A. Harris TR 3:00 PM-4:15 PM
Uses the insights of Freud and Jung to illuminate myths (ancient and modern) and examines techniques for dramatizing the life of the mind in fiction and drama. Selections by Strindberg, Lawrence, James, O’Neil, et al.

EN 227 AMERICAN IMAGES IN LITERATURE (3)
Instructor: K. Kornacki MW 10:00 AM-11:15 AM
Explores short stories, novels, and poetry embodying various images of America—its geography, values, customs, and people— emphasizing the subject and quality of the images presented, the literary techniques with which these are developed, and the total self-reflection of the country which they convey.

EN 229 LITERATURE & THE ARTS (3)
Instructor: M. Lindroth TR 10:00 AM-11:15 AM
Surveys the relationships between literature and other major art forms: music, dance, film, painting, sculpture and demonstrates what is gained and lost when literary classics are interpreted in other creative media.

EN 240 001 INTRO TO POETRY (3)
Instructor: M. Miller MW 1:00 PM-2:15 PM
Provides a solid foundation in the essential vocabulary for interpreting poems and appreciating the techniques of poets both traditional and contemporary. Offers an optional service-learning component, giving the opportunity to volunteer to work in groups with a local, published poet in a variety of ways.

EN 240 002 INTRO TO POETRY (3)
Instructor: M. Miller TR 11:30 AM-12:45 PM
Provides a solid foundation in the essential vocabulary for interpreting poems and appreciating the techniques of poets both traditional and contemporary. Offers an optional service-learning component, giving the opportunity to volunteer to work in groups with a local, published poet in a variety of ways.

EN 304 (EG) LITERATURE & DIVERSITY (3)
Instructor: D. Anderson MW 3:00 PM-4:15 PM
This course focuses on literary works that foreground or thematize forms of social diversity or difference—“race” and ethnicity, gender, sexuality, class, disability, etc. The course introduces students to works of (mostly) American literature that explore the social construction and significance of diverse identities—how and by whom these identities are defined, valued and contested; how they influence experience and perception; how they shape or misshape human interactions; and, not least, how they are continually complicated or problematized by the complexities of individual lives (e.g., the fact that we often inhabit multiple “identities” simultaneously) and the reality of our common humanity.

EN 306 ENGLISH LITERATURE (3)
Instructor: M. Miller MW 10:00 AM-11:15 AM
Covers the development of English literature from early medieval to modern times, including readings from representative authors of each period.

EN 307 MODERN DRAMA (3)
Instructor: M. Lindroth MW 1:00 PM-2:15 PM
Explores the plays, theaters and audiences of modern and contemporary theater. While the central focus is on American and British plays, several of the plays will provide a global perspective.

EN 319 WRITING THE SELF IN POETRY AND PROS (3)
Instructor: K. Jorgensen T 4:20 PM-6:50 PM
Writing the Self in Poetry and Prose is a hybrid literature/creative writing/performance course that allows students to explore the possibilities for self-expression in poetry and personal essays. Students read and analyze examples of personal essays and lyric poetry by published authors; read and discuss a guidebook discussion of craft; write their own pieces in a collaborative, workshop setting that encourages critique and revision; and, ultimately, perform selected pieces for their classmates and/or a campus audience in a campus venue. Though there will be a strong autobiographical element in the writing studied and produced for the course, students will also be encouraged to think about how their experiences and concerns as individual writers intersect with the wider world and can be expressed in ways that will engage an audience.

EN 334 (EE) REFUGEE CRISIS IN WORLD LIT (3)
Instructor: D. Anderson TR 10:00 AM-11:15 AM
**Ethical Inquiry Effective, Fall 2019 forward.** The number of people forced to flee their homes by war, persecution, poverty and environmental degradation is greater today (over sixty-five million) than at any other time in world history. Stories of deadly journeys, squalid camps, border walls, travel bans, separated families and rising xenophobia have become a commonplace of the nightly news, but so too have individual acts of kindness and collective expressions of solidarity with the most vulnerable. As David Miliband, head of the International Rescue Committee has powerfully argued, how individuals and their governments respond to the refugee crisis is a test not only of a society’s laws and policies but of our values: “Empathy and altruism are two of the foundations of civilization. Turn that empathy and altruism into action and we live out a basic moral credo.” This course explores the ethical issues raised by current and past refugee crises through the lens of global literature, reading novels, short stories, poems, plays and creative non-fiction for what they can tell us about our ethical duty to one another, especially as that duty may be complicated by cultural differences, social divisions and the operation of social forces beyond individual control.” Enriched Core: Ethical Inquiry and Applications.

EN 345 AFRICAN-AMERICAN LITERATURE (3)
Instructor: K. Kornacki MW 3:00 PM-4:15 PM
Surveys African American literature starting with historical texts including poetry, slave narratives, folk tales and African-American spirituals, through post-Emancipation literature of racial uplift and polemic writing, to the literature of the Harlem Renaissance. Moving through the twentieth century, the course examines social protest literature, autobiographical writing, feminist statements, and neo-slave narratives. The institution of slavery and its legacy loom large in many of the texts. Beginning with Frederick Douglass’s foundational Narrative (1845) and culminating in Octavia Butler’s neo-slave narrative, Kindred (1979), we will pay particular attention to the role of memory and self-representation in literature and appreciate literature as a tool for social justice. Includes a field trip to the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture and a walking tour of Harlem.

EN 401 SHAKESPEARE:POL.PLAY (3)
Instructor: M. Lindroth TR 8:30 AM-9:45 AM
Explores Shakespeare’s interpretation of the use and abuse of political power while tracing his dramatic development through critical reading of representative plays.

EN 403 LIT VICTORIAN AGE
Instructor: M. Miller
Studies the variety of trends present in English literature in the period from 1832 to 1900 as shown in the works of Tennyson, Browning, Arnold and others.

EN 410 ENGLISH SEMINAR
Instructor: T. Harney-Mahajan MW 1:00 PM-2:15 PM
One of the final courses that an English major takes, the “Senior Portfolio Project” offers students the opportunity to revisit several papers written for English classes taken at Caldwell University. In this capstone course, students will heavily revise these papers according to certain guidelines, incorporate the process of self-reflection, and ultimately create an e-portfolio that will showcase their accomplishments as English majors. *Formerly English Seminar through Spring 2019.

EN 418 GUILTY PLEASURES: READING & WRITING
Instructor: E. Eklund R 4:20 PM-6:50 PM
When we stay up far into the night reading a novel instead of sleeping, chances are that the book in question is not one of the “classics” typically enshrined in literature anthologies and taught in college English courses but a psychological thriller, romance novel, detective story, horror novel or science fiction narrative. For many of us, these and other forms of genre fiction constitute a vital part of our extracurricular reading—the reading we do, perhaps somewhat guiltily, for fun. Guilty Pleasures: Reading and Writing Genre Fiction starts from the premise that we need not apologize for the pleasure we find in the books of Stephen King or Octavia Butler or Patricia Highsmith—to take three well known examples—that genre fiction often has great literary value, and that it can teach us a lot about how fiction works. This course introduces students to some of the best short fiction in a selected genre and helps them apply what they have learned in short stories of their own creation.