Fall 2019 Courses

EN 101 THE PROCESS OF WRITING (3)
Offers intensive work in generating ideas, organization, style, and mechanics for the development of college-level writing. Admission by assignment. Does not fulfill core requirement in English.

EN 111 COLLEGE WRITING (3)
A writing intensive course that develops students’ college-level writing competence; writing is taught as a process that entails a series of revisions through the completion of several short assignments and longer expository essays. Includes preparation of a research paper and instruction in MLA style. Introduces literary analysis, terminology, and technique by reading and interpreting literature that comprises various genres and represents diverse cultures.

EN 222 LITERATURE & LAW (3)
Instructor: M. Miller R 7:00 PM-9:30 PM
Explores concepts of law and justice in selected masterworks of fiction and drama. Recommended for, but not restricted to, criminal justice majors.

EN 226 PSYCH AND LITERATURE (3)
Instructor: V. Cirillo T 7:00 PM-9:30 PM
Uses the insights of Freud and Jung to illuminate myths (ancient and modern) and examines techniques for dramatizing the life of the mind in fiction and drama. Selections by Strindberg, Lawrence, James, O’Neil, et al.

EN 227 AMER IMAGES IN LIT (3)
Instructor: D. Whelan MW 10:00 AM-11:15 AM
Explores short stories, novels, and poetry embodying various images of America—its geography, values, customs, and people— emphasizing the subject and quality of the images presented, the literary techniques with which these are developed, and the total self-reflection of the country which they convey.

EN 230 LITERATURE AND MEDICINE (3)
Instructor: M. Lindroth TR 11:30 AM-12:45 PM
This course focuses on writers who have depicted illness and the universal questions common to all humans as they face their own mortality. While there is a long history of literature that reflects this topic, this course will consider more contemporary illnesses through the genres of fiction, non¬fiction, drama and poetry to make discussion more relevant for students.

EN 301 MASTERPIECES OF WESTERN LITERATURE (3)
Instructor: T. Harney-Mahajan TF 11:30 AM-12:45 PM
Surveys major literary texts in the history of the western & world literature with an emphasis on those considered essential to an understanding of British and American literature.

EN 302 RENAISSANCE: SPENSER TO MILTON (3)
Instructor: M. Lindroth TR 10:00 AM-11:15 AM
Studies poetry, prose and dramatic works of the men and women of the English Renaissance in relation to the continental Renaissance and the non-Western world. We will focus on the cultural, historical and literary contexts that shaped the age and its literature, featuring both well-known writers like Edmund Spenser, Lady Mary Wroth, Sir Philip Sidney, and John Milton as well as lesser-known writers like Elizabeth Cary. (Formally named Renaissance: Poetry and Prose prior to Fall 2015).

EN 305 AMERICAN LITERATURE (3)
Instructor: K. Kornacki MWF 10:00 AM-10:50 AM
Surveys over three hundred years of American literature beginning with the Puritans and other early English settlers and ending in the first half of the twentieth century, with an emphasis on the nineteenth century. Ranging across a variety of genres, modes, and literary movements, from the early Puritan “plain style” to the nineteenth-century American literary Renaissance, from realism and regional local color writing to modernism, from Realism to the Harlem Renaissance, this class will explore how American writers have created an American subject.

EN 312 THE ENGLISH NOVEL (3)
Instructor: K. Kornacki W 4:20 PM-6:50 PM
Traces the origin of the novel and its development as a literary form. Studies representative works of chief novelists of the 18th, 19th, and 20th centuries.

EN 317 LITERARY CRITICISM (3)
Instructor: M. Lindroth MW 1:00 PM-2:15 PM
Explores contemporary critical approaches to literature, including new historicist, feminist, psychoanalytic, Marxist, African-American criticism, postcolonial, and lesbian/gay/queer criticism. We will examine the various theories as well as the assumptions and values upon which they rely in seminar form, developing the tools of literary analysis.

EN 320 WRITING POWER (3)
Offers an intensive writing workshop for students determined to advance from average to superior writing performance. Emphasis on effective strategies for producing compelling prose in many disciplines.

EN 323 JOURNAL EDITING: PRESENCE (3)
Instructor: M. Miller TR 1:00 PM-2:15 PM
This course will enable students to exercise a critical eye in selecting poems written in a wide variety of styles by numerous contemporary poets from across the USA on the basis of their artistic merit and their fulfillment of a working definition of “Catholic Art.” It introduces students to professional interviewing techniques required when interviewing award-winning, published poets and strengthens their literary writing skills when articulating how these poets find their literary works to be formed by their Catholic faith. It will also require students to read the selections published in a number of current literary journals devoted to publishing works that intersect with religious faith and spirituality with a view toward providing a unique contribution to the field through the selection of poetry for this journal, Presence: A Journal of Catholic Poetry. Students will also write short reviews of recently published collections of poems and exercise research skills to find forthcoming titles of poetry collections to list in the journal’s announcement section.

EN 324 (EC) CATHOLIC WRITERS (3)
Instructor: M. Miller TF 10:00 AM-11:15 AM
Studies a range of major authors from the medieval period to the 21st century whose Catholicism is central to their artistic vision, influencing the content and/or the form of their work. Genres include epic, lyric, short fiction, novel, and graphic novel. Works are read from a theological perspective, and requirements include a written analysis of a contemporary film from this perspective. Writers include Dante, Gerard Manley Hopkins, Flannery O’Connor, Alice McDermott, and Gene Luen Yang.

EN 349 (EG) LITERATURE & THE ENVIRONMENT (3)
Instructor: C. Echterling WF 1:00 PM-2:15 PM
Introduces students to American nature/environmental writing and explores the different ways writers have thought about our relationship to the natural world. Reading texts ranging across time and space, we discuss the kinds of questions they raise and try to answer: What obligations do people have to other species? What is our relation to the natural places or bioregions we inhabit? What environmental threats do we face, and how can they be addressed? What is the relationship between environmental and social justice? In addition to reading, discussing, and writing about the work of others, students also have an opportunity to do some “field observations,” spending some class time outside directly observing nature in order to produce their own creative nonfiction essays.

EN 406 CREATIVE WRITING (3)
Instructor: K Jorgensen T 4:20 PM-6:50 PM
Offers an intensive exploration of the short story and lyric poetry. A workshop for students interested in developing creative talents. Opportunity for publication in literary magazine.

EN 410 SENIOR PORTFOLIO PROJECT (3)
Instructor: T. Harney-Mahajan MW 3:00 PM-4:15 PM
One of the final courses that an English major takes, the “Senior Portfolio Project” offers students the opportunity to revisit several papers written for English classes taken at Caldwell University. In this capstone course, students will heavily revise these papers according to certain guidelines, incorporate the process of self-reflection, and ultimately create an e-portfolio that will showcase their accomplishments as English majors. *Formerly English Seminar through Spring 2019.