Sociology and Criminal Justice

CHAIRED BY YANG CAI, Ph.D.

The department offers a B.A. degree in sociology and criminal justice. Internship and independent studies are available to qualified sociology and criminal justice majors.

Sociology MajorCriminal Justice MajorInterdisciplinary Certificate Program (Criminal Forensics)
 

Requirements for a Sociology Major

DEGREE: Bachelor of Arts 

Liberal Arts Core 49 credits
Sociology 33 credits
Open Electives 38 credits
Total 120 credits

 STUDENTS WHO MAJOR IN SOCIOLOGY MUST COMPLETE:

SO 101 Introduction to Sociology I (Core Curriculum requirement)
SO 236 Sociological Theory
SO 344 Methods of Social Research I
SO 346 Methods of Social Research II (prerequisite SO 344)
SO 487 Field Internship 
and a minimum of seven (7) additional sociology electives numbered 200 and above, among which up to two of the following cross-listed courses may be included:

All courses with a CJ prefix;
CO 312 Media and Society
PS 314 Social Psychology

The department suggests that students with a major in sociology choose a minor in business, computer science, psychology, Spanish or communication arts. Students should also consider a double major with criminal justice or psychology.

Requirements for a Criminal Justice Major

DEGREE: Bachelor of Arts 

Liberal Arts Core 49 credits
Criminal Justice 39 credits
Open Electives 32 credits
Total 120 credits

STUDENTS WHO MAJOR IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE MUST COMPLETE:

CJ 201 Introduction to Criminal Justice (prerequisite to required CJ courses)
SO 344 Methods of Social Research I
SO 346 Methods of Social Research II (prerequisite SO 344)
CJ 275 Juvenile Justice
CJ 280 Community-Based Corrections OR CJ 290 Institutional Treatment of the Offender
CJ 384 Police and Law Enforcement
CJ 390 U.S. Courts: Structure and Functioning
CJ 430 Crime and Criminal Law
CJ 487 Field Internship
SO 335 Criminology

and three (3) elective courses, one from each of the following three clusters:

Criminal Justice Cluster

AN/CJ 420    Forensic Anthropology
CJ 228           Cybercrime
CJ 250          Victimology
CJ/CO 255    Criminal Justice Issues and the Media
CJ/PO 260    Domestic and International Terrorism
CJ 350          The Criminal Justice System and Women
CJ 387          Organized Crime in America
CJ 388          Counseling and Guidance of the Offender
CJ 410a        Seminar: Topics in Criminal Justice
CJ 425          Crime Scene Processing and Investigation
CJ 428          Criminalistics
CJ 499          Independent Study

Sociology Cluster

AN 410a    Seminar: Topics in Anthropology
SO 231       Sociology of Poverty
SO 323       Sociology of Racial and Cultural Groups
SO 348       Sociology of Deviance
SO 410a    Seminar: Topics in Sociology
SO 476      Urban Sociology

Political Science/Psychology Cluster

CJ/PO 260   Domestic and International Terrorism
PO 225          American Government
PO 230         State and Local Government
PO 330         Introduction to the American Legal System
PO 372         Introduction to Public Administration
PO 375         Public Policy
PS 318         Cross-Cultural Counseling
PS 324         Forensic Psychology
PS 330         Psychology of Addiction

The department suggests that students with a major in criminal justice choose a minor in sociology, psychology, computer science or political science. Students should also consider a double major in sociology, psychology, history, or political science.

The interdisciplinary Certificate Program in Criminal Forensics exposes students to diverse areas of forensic study, including Forensic Psychology, Forensic Anthropology, and Criminalistics. Students will develop a basic familiarity with forensics and an appreciation for this field of study. As a result, they will be better prepared to make an informed decision about pursuing advanced coursework in forensics. Additionally, the certificate program provides students with a competitive edge in their careers. The program accentuates the usefulness of the social, behavioral, and physical sciences in understanding and exploring criminal behavior, solving crimes, and answering legal questions.

The Program (eight courses or twenty-four credits)
STUDENTS ARE REQUIRED TO TAKE EIGHT OF THE FOLLOWING NINE COURSES:

AN/CJ 420 Forensic Anthropology
CJ 228          Cybercrime
CJ 250         Victimology 
CJ 410a       Seminar: Profiling Serial and Mass Murderers
CJ 425         Crime Scene Processing and Investigation
CJ 428         Criminalistics 
CJ 487         Field Internship
PS 324         Forensic Psychology
PS 309        Psychopathology (prerequisite: PS 232 Psychology of Personality)
PS 330        Psychology of Addiction

Students are allowed to cross-list up to two of these courses with another major, minor, or certificate program.

STATEMENT OF OUTCOMES ASSESSMENT

Two fundamental learning goals of the sociology and criminal justice major are student competence in research methods and theory. The Department meets these goals through our courses in Social Science Research Methods, Criminology, and Sociological Theory. Methods of Social Research I and II are required for both sociology and criminal justice majors, while Sociological Theory is required of sociology majors and Criminology is required of criminal justice majors. After completing the required outcomes assessment courses, sociology and criminal justice majors should be able to:

1. describe and apply classical and contemporary theories in at least one area of social reality;
2. describe and evaluate classical and contemporary theories of crime causation and apply these theories to real world phenomena;
3. identify basic methodological approaches and describe the general role of methods in building sociological knowledge;
4. design a research study in an area of choice;
5. develop proficiency in understanding statistics sufficiently to analyze scholarly articles in the field;
6. conduct social research by developing, administering, and analyzing surveys.

 

In each of the required theory and research courses, the instructor of the outcomes assessment course is responsible for awarding student grades; however, outcomes assessment is the shared responsibility of all full-time department faculty. It is at the discretion of the individual instructor whether or not to consider departmental faculty evaluations of student work in their courses when awarding student grades for the course.

For sociology majors, departmental faculty will review and evaluate the research paper submitted in Sociological Theory and the final paper submitted for Methods of Social Research II. For criminal justice majors, departmental faculty will critique and assess the research paper submitted in Criminology and the final paper submitted for Methods of Social Research II. For students majoring in both sociology and criminal justice, three evaluations will be done by departmental faculty: the research paper for Sociological Theory, Criminology, and Methods of Social Research II.

For a student to pass his/her outcomes assessment requirement, a majority of the departmental faculty must agree that the quality of the work done for both courses demonstrates competence. If a student fails to meet the necessary criteria for any of their outcomes assessment paper requirements, the student may: (1) revise the written work, submit a new paper for consideration prior to the end of the semester during which the student is enrolled in the course, and give an oral presentation of the paper before the department faculty reviewers; (2) request an Incomplete (in accordance with the Academic Policies set forth in the Caldwell University Undergraduate Catalog), revise the written work, submit a new paper for consideration within the allotted time period, and give an oral presentation of the paper before the department faculty reviewers; or (3) repeat the course (in accordance with the Academic Policies set forth in the Caldwell University Undergraduate Catalog).

It is possible that a student may pass his/her outcomes assessment but receive less than a C grade for the course in which the outcomes assessment work was done. In such a case, the student does not have to go through the outcomes assessment process again; however, the course has to be repeated, since students must achieve at least a C grade in all required courses for the major.

It is also conceivable that a student may fail the outcomes assessment process, yet achieve a C or better in the course in which the outcomes assessment work was required. In such a case, the student does not have to repeat the course, but must follow guidelines outlined above for students who do not pass their outcome assessment requirement.


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